Police now believe that the Grenfell Tower fire was corporate manslaughter

The Metropolitan Police have "reasonable grounds" to suspect Kensington and Chelsea Council and a tenant management company of the offence.

G-Shock released a limited edition watch for NS50, but you’ll be hard-pressed trying to get one

CASIO G-SHOCK's Facebook page
Yet another brand has jumped on the NS50 bandwagon. This time, it's Casio's G-Shock with its popular GX-56BB watch sporting an army-inspired design. Officially released at nine G-Factory outlets across Singapore on Friday morning, the watch features the classic GX-56BB face with a "pixelised camouflage print" strap. NS50 is the term used to refer to Singapore's 50th year of National Service. Casio announced the release of the limited edition watch on its Facebook page on Thursday morning, but did not say how much it would cost or how many pieces were produced. A staff at the G-Factory Premium store in Marina Bay Sands told Business Insider the watch went on sale at 10am at a retail price of $269. And they are selling out fast. When we called the G-Factory Premium store at around 3:20pm, we were told that there were "very few" pieces left. Around the same time, the store at Ion Orchard had already run out of the NS50 watch completely, while the Bugis branch only had one left. Good news for Casio, but many G-Shock fans are probably going to be disappointed. By 5pm, Business Insider counted 14 opportunistic sellers who had put up the watch for re-sale on online marketplace Carousell with asking prices ranging from $280 to $2,699.99. [caption id="attachment_359982" align="alignnone" width="959"] Screengrab showing G-Shock's limited edition NS50 watch listed on Carousell[/caption] Tough luck.

What's Happening

Trial for two female suspects in Kim Jong Nam killing set for Oct 2

FILE PHOTO: Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong (L) and Indonesian Siti Aishah are seen in this combination picture from undated handouts released by the Royal Malaysia Police to Reuters on February 19, 2017
Reuters
KUALA LUMPUR, July 28 (Reuters) - Malaysia will begin on October 2 the trial of two women accused of the dramatic killing of the estranged half brother of North Korea's leader, the High Court said on Friday. Indonesian Siti Aisyah, 25, and Doan Thi Huong, 28, from Vietnam, are charged with murdering Kim Jong Nam at Kuala Lumpur airport on Feb. 13 by smearing his face with VX, a chemical the United Nations describes as a weapon of mass destruction. Appearing at the Shah Alam High Court on the outskirts of the capital, Kuala Lumpur, both women were handcuffed and wearing bullet-proof vests over Malay traditional costume, consisting of a floor-length skirt and a blouse. "We will start in October," said Judge Azmi Ariffin. "The hearing has been fixed for the second." Both cases would be tried jointly, with pleas taken at the first hearing, he added. If convicted, the women could face the death penalty. Doan smiled during the hearing, but Siti Aisyah was in tears afterwards, with her lawyers seen trying to calm her. Defence lawyers have warned previously that they feared "trial by ambush", with police not sharing evidence. Prosecutor Muhamad Iskandar Ahmad said the prosecution had given a further 33 documents and CCTV recordings to the defence, and would call between 30 and 40 witnesses, depending on the progress of the trial. "Having seen the CCTV recordings, I hope the judge will have a better understanding of how the situation took place," said Gooi Soon Seng, Siti Aisyah's lawyer, adding that he had asked for a visit to the crime scene during the trial. Kim was the eldest son of the late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il. His half brother, Kim Jong Un, became North Korean leader when their father died in 2011. U.S. and South Korean officials say the North Korean regime was behind the murder of Kim, who lived in exile in Macau and had criticized his family's dynastic rule of North Korea. North Korea has refused to accept the dead man was Kim Jong Un's half brother, suggesting instead he died of a heart attack. Aisyah and Huong have told diplomats from their countries that they believed they were participating in a reality television show prank when they assaulted Kim Jong Nam.

Changi Airport’s Terminal 4 is all it’s hyped up to be – here’s what it looks like

Changi Airport's T4 is worthy of all the hype and more.
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
Everyone knows that when it comes to having the world’s best airport, Singapore is a hard one to beat. In fact, earlier this year (March 15), Changi Airport was conferred the Skytrax World’s Best Airport Award - a title it has defended for the past five consecutive years. So when you’re on top of your game, it is even possible to up the novelty factor and impress travellers even more? If you're one of the fortunate 200,000 who will attend the Changi Airport Terminal 4 open house from Aug 7 to Aug 20, you'll find out the answer to that question on your own. If you couldn't get your hands on the tickets to it because they've already been snapped up, fret not, we've got you covered with some highlights from the tour.
Changi Airport's latest addition has been unveiled after three years of being in the works.  A two-story building that's 225,000 sq m (approximately the size of 27 football fields), the new Terminal 4 (T4) can serve 16 million passengers a year, adding to the airport's current annual handling capacity of 66 million passengers. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
It is the first terminal to offer end-to-end Fast and Seamless Travel (FAST) for departing passengers. This means that if you're travelling through T4, there's added flexibility of doing a flight check-in at your own convenience without being bogged down by waiting times.  Confused? Don't be. Let us show you how it's done.  First, you retrieve your boarding pass at a automated check-in kiosk which you might have already seen or used at the other terminals. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
Next, proceed to the automated bag drop where your photo is captured and matched against your passport photo.  If you're wondering if the automated system allows you to get away with over-sized luggage, don't even try.  There are three Kinect cameras (yes, they're the ones used in your Xbox) used to corroborate a 3D image which will tell the machine whether your bag can go on the conveyor belt or not. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
The next step is to proceed to every Singaporean's favourite gate - the AIG (automated immigration gate) where you scan your passport and thumbprint before heading off to catch your flight. At T4, the ones used are a more technologically enhanced version, which films a video clip of your face while you're scanning your passport. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
The best frame of your face will then be selected (referred to as "photo of the day"), which is used for authentication at the boarding gate (pictured below).  This also means you don't have to get your passports ready for the flight attendant to check before boarding as you'll only be required to scan your boarding pass.  The facial recognition software will match the photo taken at the boarding gate to the one taken at the AIG and allow you through towards boarding. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
If you're like me, the biggest headache will be getting past security screening - I'm the careless sort, and have forgotten in the past about that stray water bottle until I got called over to sheepishly empty my bag. But not to worry, the new terminal has a spectacular "immersive wall" spanning across the entire security area for you to watch in awe of while you wait for your turn. This is supposed to lower stress levels of passengers through the sounds of soothing music and invigorating animated visuals.  The 70m by 5m wall is equipped with a LED display that showcases 17 different clips, each lasting about two to four minutes.  via GIPHY Another feature that drastically helps lower stress levels  - if at all - is the computed tomography (CT) scanners (they're the ones used for x-rays in hospitals) used at all security lanes to screen hand luggage.  If you're travelling through T4, never again will you have to pull off the feat of opening your backpack and taking out your electronic gagdets while simultaneously trying to take off your jacket and not hold up the queue.  With state-of-the-art 3D screening technology, you can leave your electronics and inside bags and not worry about the hassle. 
Supplied/ Changi Airport Group
Another impressive art feature is the Heritage Zone, which, at first glance looks like a facade of historic shophouses, similar to the ones lining the roads of Chinatown.  The façade's design is displayed chronologically, from the baroque design of the 1880s, to the Modern Decor of the 1930s. History lesson? Check.
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
See if you can spot homegrown food brands Old Chang Kee, Bengawan Solo and Bee Cheng Hiang (pictured above).  If you're a fan of their offerings, you'll be happy to know that their physical shops will be at T4. So you can sit back, relax with a curry puff, slice of cake or bak kwa, and enjoy a six-minute animated performance telling the tale of two Peranakan musicians.
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
True to Changi Airport's dedication to details, it's even incorporated culture into a toilet by outfitting the ones located at the Heritage Zone with a British colonial-style design. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
From the patterned floor tiles, pendant lamp shades and gorgeous Peranakan tile decor, T4 has really set the bar high in terms of toilet designs. Pretty swanky, right? My visits to the bathroom will never be the same. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
Nine airlines will operate at T4 - AirAsia Berhad, Indonesia AirAsia, Thai AirAsia, Philippines AirAsia, AirAsia India, Cathay Pacific, Cebu Pacific, Korean Air, Spring Airlines and Vietnam Airlines.  Together, they will serve an estimated eight million passengers a year, half of T4's full handling capacity. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
For the open house, some airlines like Korean Air (pictures below) will have some adorable art installations for you to up your Instagram game. 
Business Insider/ Joey Lee
At the end of the day though, T4 is at its heart, an airport designed to serve travellers.  But it's Changi Airport's level of diligence towards improving user experience and minimising the frustration people feel when having to catch a plane, that fills me with a sense of pride every time I touch down in Singapore.
Business Insider/ Joey Lee

Serangoon Ville sold en-bloc for S$499 million and it’s more than what owners expected

Privatised HUDC estate Serangoon Ville has been sold for S$499 million ($368 million) to an Oxley Holdings-led consortium. This is well above the S$400 million to S$430 million the owners were expecting when the property went on sale last month, reported The Business Times. The sale marks the sixth collective deal so far this year, according to The Straits Times, and is already double the three deals in all of last year. The buyer, joint venture firm Oxley Serangoon, is made up of partners including Oxley Holdings, Lian Beng Group, Apricot Capital and entities of KSH Holdings and Heeton Holdings. The consortium also has to pay S$195 million in estimated charges to top up the lease to 99 years and intensify the land use, added The Straits Times. Serangoon Ville comprises 244 apartments and maisonettes across seven blocks which sit on 296,913 sq ft triangular-sized plot. Unit sizes range from 1,625 sq ft to 1,733 sq ft. Owners are expected to pocket $2 million each on average, added The Business Times which spoke to ERA Realty, the firm which brokered the deal. Serangoon Ville was privatised in 2014 and has 69 years of lease left.

Vegetarians, here’s what you can order at hawker centres – we even worked out 3 meal options for you

There's always something for everyone at the hawker centre.
The Straits Times
As a country that boasts eating as a national pastime, it's no secret that Singaporeans are big foodies who are always on the lookout for interesting twists of our local dishes. That being said, we're still basic at heart and often go back our hawker classics because they're a quick, affordable and fuss-free dining option. But to the uninitiated or someone with a dietary restriction, the cornucopia that's our hawker centre can prove inundating, and this isn't helped by the maze-like placement of food stalls. So if you're a vegetarian who always find yourself lost in the midst of the sprawling food centre, here's a helpful list of 15 options you can have. We've even broken it down to specific meals so you can plan your day better. Now go forth and explore. Breakfast 1. Chee Cheong Fun A light but flavourful dish for breakfast, these innocuous white rice flour rolls are dusted with sesame seeds. Its name means "pig intestines noodles" when translated to Mandarin but don't panic -  there's no meat in the plain ones (pictured below). There are versions with prawn or barbecued pork rolled inside so take note to only ask for the plain ones.
The Straits Times
2. You Tiao and Tau Huay combo Some say that you tiao (Fried dough fritters made of flour) and tau huay (soybean pudding with sugar syrup) make the perfect breakfast pairing. In fact, a local musician has even made a song comparing the compatibility of a pair of lovers to that of these two food items. It's a no-brainer.
The New Paper
3. Chai Tow Kway (Locally known as 'carrot cake') Somewhere in time, the name of this dish was lost in translation, because it contains no carrots and definitely does isn't a cake. It's actually stir-fried "radish-cake" cubes tossed with eggs and preserved radish commonly available in the black and white (sans sweet dark sauce) versions - opt for a mix of both if you're the adventurous kind.
The New Paper
4. Chwee Kueh  A common breakfast item that's usually sold out by lunch if it's bought from a popular stall. These white basin-shaped steamed rice cakes are a mixture of rice flour and water and topped with diced preserved radish.
The New Paper
5. Vegetarian Bee Hoon Also known as 'Zhai Mi Fen' in Mandarin, plates with a mountain of these stir-fried vermicelli noodles rarely cost more than $3 and are available from vegetarian stalls where other side dishes sold are also meatless.
The Straits Times
Lunch 1. Roti Prata Commonly found at Indian-Muslim food stalls, roti prata, which is essentially fried flatbread, is best enjoyed when you peeled with fingers and dipped in curry gravy or sugar. Take note to ask for Dhal curry which is made up of lentils, tomatoes, chillies and other assorted spices, otherwise the seller automatically serves it with fish or chicken curry.
The Straits Times
2. Thosai Often lauded as the healthier cousin of roti prata, thosai is similar to a sour pancake made of fermented batter accompanied by various dipping sauces like coconut chutney and Dhal. The seller might sometimes provide fish or chicken curry as a third dip so if you want to keep it fully vegetarian, make sure to ask what kinds of dip are offered.
The New Paper
3. Gado-gado (A salad that means 'mix-mix' in Indonesian) A dish that's becoming harder to find in hawker centres, gado-gado is an Indonesian-style salad typically made with fried tofu, bean sprouts, hard-boiled eggs and vegetables, tossed with a spicy peanut sauce and topped with crispy tapioca crackers.
The New Paper
Dinner  1. Nasi Padang (Literally means 'field rice' in Malay) With a wide variety of delicious Malay-style side dishes, deciding what to eat may cause anxiety for some patrons but sellers are usually nice enough to provide recommendations. Some popular options for vegetarians include sambal goreng-tahu tempe (spicy stir-fried long beans with deep-fried bean curd and fermented soy bean cake), curry vegetables and begedil (deep-fried potato patty with spices). You don't want to miss this.
The Straits Times
2. Longtong Sayur Lodeh  A assortment of curry vegetables, ketupat (steamed rice cakes), hard-boiled eggs and vermicelli, longtong sayur lodeh is a Malay dish that's popular among those who prefer curries that are not so spicy.
The New Paper
3. Nasi Goreng or Mee Goreng  Consisting of rice (nasi) or yellow noodles (mee) that's stir-fried with garlic, onions, vegetable and eggs in a medley of various sauces, this dish can be served meatless but you will need to let the seller know when ordering. For some reason, it's also commonly served with a side of cucumber slices and a splash of tomato ketchup.
The New Paper
Dessert or snacks 1. Rojak ('Mixture' in colloquial Malay) The quintessential Singaporean dish, rojak is a salad of mixed vegetables, fruits and you tiao (fried dough fritters) covered in sticky black sauce and garnished with chopped peanuts. A mix of sweet and savoury to test your tastebuds, this uniquely Singaporean salad is often ordered as a snack during the long hours of the afternoon, or even as an appetiser before dinner dishes are served.
The New Paper
2. Ice Kachang ('Iced bean' in Malay) A colourful mountain of shaved ice drizzled with sweet syrup mixed with different food colourings, the "bean" part of its name comes the lower layers of red beans, jelly, sweet corn and attap chee (palm seeds). Other wacky variants of this dessert include those drizzled with durian (pictured below) or mango sauce.
The Straits Times
3. Mee Chiang Kueh ('Peanut pancake' in Hokkien) An old-school snack that's made by pouring batter on a flat griddle to make a large pancake, this item is typically available with other fillings like red bean paste and grated coconut. Modern versions include cheese and chocolate but the original peanut filling is usually the most popular.
The Straits Times
You need to know this: Yong Tau Foo If you've been ordering yong tau foo from these stalls with open-air glass displays filled with an assortment of vegetables and tofu pieces, you might want to ask what kind of broth they're cooking it in. That's because Chinese-style soups are often cooked with animal bones like chicken or pork, when they're making the stock. Big tip: Never assume and always ask first, because the vendors are often more than willing to offer a helping hand.
The Straits Times

Meet Kristin Beck, the transgender Navy SEAL hero fighting Trump’s proposed trans ban

She earned 29 medals, completed 13 deployments — and has some tough words for Trump.

Johor had the highest number of child rape cases in Malaysia in the past 7 years

When it comes to crime prevention, more needs to be done to protect women and children in Malaysia. The Dewan Rakyat was told on Thursday that a total of 22,234 cases of sexual abuse against minors below 18 years old were reported in the period between 2010 and May 2017. Out of these, a staggering 13,272 were rape cases, which is equivalent to about five cases every day, The Star reported. The other cases involved molestation (6,014 cases), incest (1,796 cases) and unnatural sex (1,152 cases). Johor recorded the highest number of rape cases across Malaysia, with 2,089 known cases taking up 15.73 per cent of the total number. Sabah recorded the highest number of incest cases at 263, while Selangor recorded the most cases of unnatural sex (235 cases) and molestation (1,052 cases). Women, Family and Community Development Minister Datuk Seri Rohani Abdul Karim, who revealed the numbers, also added that there were 2,244 cases of non-sexual physical abuse involving male perpetrators and female victims in the same time period. Rohani added that a special court was set up on June 22 to speed up the trial of child sex crimes in the country. The special court will be formed in all 13 states, with those that recorded a high number of child sex crimes given priority, The Malaysian Insight reported.  

Amazon launches Prime Now in Singapore – and it’s taking on Alibaba

SINGAPORE, July 27 (Reuters) - Amazon launched its two-hour delivery service in Singapore on Thursday, marking the e-commerce giant's push into populous Southeast Asia and its first head-on battle with its Chinese rival, Alibaba Group Holding. While Amazon does deliver to Singapore, higher-end services had not been available, such as Prime services which include access to the company's video-streaming service. The Prime Now Singapore website, which went live on Thursday, promises delivery within two hours. In Asia, Amazon has largely sidestepped China and focused on India. But its arrival in Singapore, a tiny but wealthy English-speaking city state of just over 5 million people, has been hotly anticipated as a gateway to a Southeast Asian region of 600 million, where currently only a fraction of sales are conducted online. Industry executives are preparing for a battle of titans. Alibaba owns Southeast Asia-focused Lazada, and spent an extra $1 billion to boost its stake to 83 percent last month. Ahead of Amazon's arrival, it launched subscription-based customer loyalty programme LiveUp in Singapore in April, a venture which includes ride-hailing app Uber, video streaming service Netflix and local online grocer Redmart, which it owns. "Singapore will be a test bed," said Ajay Sunder, vice president of digital transformation at Frost and Sullivan. "I would give Amazon another two quarters, they should be rolling out soon in southeast Asia, at least the major cities." Frost forecasts online product sales in southeast Asia to grow to $71 billion by 2021 from $16 billion in 2016. HOME ADVANTAGE? Since launching five years ago, Lazada has expanded into six markets in Southeast Asia: Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Besides financial support, Alibaba's investment has boosted Lazada's range of merchants and improved its logistics. Lazada and Alibaba could already be ahead, said Xiaofeng Wang, a senior analyst at research firm Forrester, with their longer experience of local customers, and with logistics and vendor systems. Amazon, though, has deep pockets, technological nous and an inventory of U.S. products, she added. But while Southeast Asia may be the last big battleground for e-commerce in Asia, it is not easy, with complex regulatory differences, language barriers and logistical barriers like the huge number of islands that make up the Philippines, or Jakarta's paralysing traffic. Internet connections can be slow or non-existent. Lazada has used third-party providers and developed its own logistics and warehouses. But the market is also fragmented, with several local players including Indonesia's Tokopedia, in which a source has said Alibaba rival, Chinese e-commerce group JD.com Inc, is considering an investment. Amazon's Prime Now is Amazon's express delivery service, which launched in New York City in December 2014 and has since expanded to several other major U.S cities, as well as European cities such as London, Berlin, Milan, and Madrid. "Prime builds loyalty, and same-day delivery adds to convenience factor," Frost's Sunder said, adding Amazon could try the service in the main Southeast Asian cities. "But Prime Now across Indonesia or across Thailand that will remain a distant reality given the logistical challenges."

Former SGX CEO Magnus Bocker dies of cancer at 55

The former chief executive who led the Singapore Exchange (SGX) following the global financial crisis has died from cancer in the United States at the age of 55, reported The Business Times. Magnus Bocker died in St Louis, Missouri, on Wednesday (July 26), said Jonas Lindstrom, Mr Bocker's partner at private investment firm Bilbros, which Mr Bocker ran after he left the SGX. Mr Lindstrom told the Business Times that Mr Bocker's family had no comment. Mr Bocker was born in Sweden and made his name on the global stage as dealmaker who helped to create the Nordic exchange group OMX. He later led its merger with Nasdaq. In 2009, Mr Bocker took over the reins at SGX from outgoing CEO Hsieh Fu Hua. During his tenure, Mr Bocker was best known for leading an attempt to merge SGX with the Australian stock exchange in 2010. The merger eventually fell to political opposition in Australia. In 2015, Mr Bocker chose not to seek renewal of his contact at a time when SGX was under fire for a number of serious trading outages. Mr Bocker continued to live in Singapore following his tenure where we ran his family's investment office.