At least 86 killed after apparent terrorist attack in Turkey’s capital

At least 86 people were killed and 186 others injured on Saturday in two huge explosions close to the main train station in Turkey’s capital Ankara.

The explosions occurred minutes apart near Ankara’s train station ahead of a peace rally calling for an end to the renewed violence between Kurdish rebels and Turkish security forces, the AP reports.

The Turkish government suspects that the twin blasts were a “terrorist” attack, an official told the AFP.

“We suspect that there is a terrorist connection,” a government official said, asking not to be named.

The rally was organized by the country’s public sector workers’ trade union.

“I strongly condemn this heinous attack on our unity and our country’s peace,”Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogansaid in a statement posted on the presidency’s website.

Mashable highlighted video footage posted by Turkish news agency Dokuz8 Haber News Agency that captures the moment of the explosion:

#Ankaradayız Emek, Barış ve Demokrasi Mitingindeki patlama anı videosu #dokuz8 / @meliketmbk pic.twitter.com/it3dodESKz

– dokuz8 (@dokuz8haber) October 10, 2015

Photos from the incident are below:

Turkish Kurdish men shout slogans during a protest against explosions at a peace march in Ankara.

Turkish protest

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REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

The original protest called for an end to the violence between Kurdish rebels and Turkish security forces.

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Demonstrators attend a protest against explosions during a peace march in Ankara, in central Istanbul, Turkey, October 10, 2015.
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REUTERS/Osman Orsal

At least one explosion shook a road junction in the centre of the Turkish capital, causing many fatalities.

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An injured man hugs an injured woman after an explosion during a peace march in Ankara, Turkey, October 10, 2015.
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REUTERS/Tumay Berkin

Riot police confronted demonstrators after the explosions.

Turkey bombings

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Demonstrators confront riot police following explosions during a peace march in Ankara, Turkey, October 10, 2015
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REUTERS/Stringer