Data-related jobs are going to be in demand in 2018, says Hays CEO Alistair Cox – here’s why

Hays CEO Alistair Cox sees a demand in 2018 for data-related jobs and a rise in Chief Automation Officers and Chief Innovation Officers in the boardroom.
Hays
  • Employees should keep their skills relevant to remain attractive to employers. Employers too, should future-proof their talent pipelines to remain competitive.
  • An increase in data-related roles and job vacancies globally for data scientists, data analysts, data artists and data visualisers is predicted in 2018.
  • Other demand jobs include cyber security officers, skilled software developers and data protection officers.
  • In the boardroom, expect a rise in demand for Chief Automation Officers and Chief Innovation Officers as businesses recognise the potential of AI and innovation.

Employees should be prepared for changes in their careers as roles inevitably become automated with the evolution and rise of technology at the workplace.

But the good news is, us humans won’t be replaced entirely, said the chief executive of global recruitment firm Hays, Mr Alistair Cox.

In his latest LinkedIn Influencer blog post, Cox said that despite “sensationalist headlines predicting the demise of the human worker, at Hays, we simply don’t see this happening”.

He wrote: “We are, in fact, seeing an explosion in new roles around AI and data and a relentless demand for specific soft skills such as adaptability, creativity and collaboration.”

“After all, and as I’ve said before, we’re yet to see an algorithm that can read things like humour, temperament or enthusiasm as effectively as a person can.”

Cox suggests that employees keep their skills relevant to remain attractive to employers and likewise, employers should future-proof their talent pipelines in order to remain competitive.

What he predicts in 2018 is an increase in data-related roles and job vacancies around the world for data scientists, data analysts, data artists and data visualisers.

“These professionals make sense of a business’s data, helping to turn zero and ones into actionable insights, whether that’s changes in customer behaviour or new opportunities which haven’t yet been spotted by human eyes,” he wrote.

Data is also driving a number of sector specific roles, including marketing jobs such as marketing automation, performance marketers and customer analytics, he said, and this demand has been created by businesses looking to target customers in more sophisticated ways.

Other roles he sees demand in include cyber security officers, skilled software developers and data protection officers.

Across the boardroom table, Cox says to expect the demand for Chief Automation Officers as businesses recognise AI’s potential as well as for Chief Innovation Officers whose primary role is to manage the process of innovation and change management.

It’s not expected to be all doom and gloom for those without technical skills though especially since soft skills will continue to be in demand, he said.

Cox explained: “While the best technical skills and qualifications in the world can be taught, they will have limited impact unless your business is equipped with managers who understand what motivates their employees, can communicate with their team effectively and listen.”

“Those organisations who can marry the best technology and ‘technical’ skills with teams who have an abundance of emotional intelligence will win.”