Drake gave his favorite video game streamer $5,000 after another successful round of ‘Fortnite’

Drake in his latest music video for the song,

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Drake in his latest music video for the song, “God’s Plan.”
source
OVO Sound

  • Drake made his second appearance on video game streaming service Twitch last night, again playing “Fortnite: Battle Royale” with Tyler “Ninja” Blevins.
  • Last time Drake played with Ninja, they set records for peak viewership for the platform.
  • Drake gave Ninja $5,000 at the end of the evening, fulfilling a promise that he would if Ninja led them to victory in the final game of the night.

Drake is most well-known for his music, but the Canadian hip-hop artist is quickly becoming known for his proclivity for video games.

Specifically, Drake is big into “Fortnite” – just like tens of millions of other people – and he’s taken to playing with the world’s most popular “Fortnite” streamer, Tyler “Ninja” Blevins. The two teamed up for the second time on Tuesday night, playing in the Duos mode of the popular “Battle Royale” game.

It was a particularly good night for Ninja, who got a free $5,000 from Drake for doing what he does best: Ninja led the duo to victory in their final game of the night. Drake had promised as much if Ninja could pull out a victory in the final game.

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“Fortnite: Battle Royale” is a free-to-play game on the iPhone, Mac, PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. It’s coming to Android soon as well.
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Epic Games

Though $5,000 for winning a round of a video game is a pretty nice bonus, Ninja is already doing pretty well for himself. The popular streamer is pulling in six figures monthly – he’s reportedly making somewhere in the range of $500,000 each month through his Twitch channel’s subscriptions alone, before sponsorships, YouTube, or any other revenue streams.

When Ninja and Drake first got together to play “Fortnite,” it broke Twitch records. Over 628,000 people were watching at one point. According to The Verge, the stream on Tuesday night drew around 230,000 concurrent viewers at its peak.