These 11 brilliant visualizations show the insides of complex things

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Fabian Oefner dismantled and photographed the inner workings of a Ferrari to make this amazing image.
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FABIAN OEFNER, “Disintegrating,” from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Cutaway illustrations are an art form of their own. So much so, in fact, that there’s now a coffee table book of them: “Look Inside” from publisher Gestalten.

The book includes a sports car “exploded” to show every part, and musculoskeletal diagrams of a baseball pitch – and they’re pretty cool to look at .

Keep reading to see some highlights.


Published in 1968, Robert W. Nicholson’s cutaway illustration of the White House showed details most people had never seen.

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ROBERT W. NICHOLSON/ NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Luxury watchmaker Audemars Piguet explodes its Royal Oak Offshore Grande Complication to show what’s inside a million-dollar watch.

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Audemars Piguet, from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Foster + Partners made this cutaway of the Gherkin to highlight the London building’s double-skin facade and show what it’s like inside.

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Foster + Partners, 30 St Mary Axe, from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Illustrator Bryan Christie shows the anatomy of a fast-ball pitch with an intricate 3D-model of the human body.

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BRYAN CHRISTIE, “Anatomy of a fast-ball” in Wired, from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Infographic designer Emilio Amade made this cutaway to illustrate Jules Verne’s imagined submarine of the future.

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El Submarino del Futuro in “El Mundo,” from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Did you know China has a cave that can fit a 747? National Geographic illustrated it with this fantastic cutaway.

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JUAN VELASCO, MARTIN GAMACHE, LAUREN JAMES / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

This NatGeo cutaway shows Venice’s best hope to stave off flooding.

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FERNANDO BAPTISTA, “Venice versus the Sea” in “National Geographic,” from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

In this promotional artwork for Russian Railways, graphic designer Vladimir Andreev cuts into the earth to show what an impressive engineering project it is.

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VLADIMIR ANDREEV, Russian Railways, from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Illustrator Bruce Morser shows what it’s like inside the International Space Station. Note the school bus for size comparison.

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BRUCE MORSER, Boeing International Space Station, from “Look Inside,” Copyright Gestalten 2016

Finally, check out the cover of the book. It shows a sculpture by artist Vincent Kohler that reconstitutes a log after it passed through the milling process

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Gestalten

Want to see more? Pick up “Look Inside” from Gestalten.