Olivia Munn is one of 6 women who have accused director Brett Ratner of sexual harassment or assault

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    Six women came forward to the Los Angeles Times with allegations of sexual harassment or assault against director and producer Brett Ratner. Ratner is known for the “Rush Hour” movies and “X-Men: The Last Stand.” One of the women who has come forward with accusations is actress Olivia Munn, who said Ratner masturbated in front of her in 2004, when she was an aspiring actress on set of one of his movies.

Six women have come forward to The Los Angeles Times with allegations of sexual harassment or assault against director and producer Brett Ratner. Ratner has directed movies like “Rush Hour” and “X-Men: The Last Stand,” and produced movies including “The Revenant” and “Horrible Bosses.”

One of the six women is actress Olivia Munn. Munn told the LA Times that Ratner masturbated in front of her on the set of his movie “After the Sunset” in 2004, when she delivered food to his trailer.

“He walked out . . . with his belly sticking out, no pants on, shrimp cocktail in one hand and he was furiously masturbating in the other,” Munn told the Times. “And before I literally could even figure out where to escape or where to look, he ejaculated.”

Munn wrote about this alleged incident in her 2010 book, “Suck It, Wonder Woman! The Misadventures of a Hollywood Geek,” but didn’t reveal the name of the director. A year later, Ratner appeared on a television show and claimed he had “banged” her (which he later said was not true, on the Howard Stern show). Munn also told the Times that she saw Ratner at a party in 2010, and he told her that he ejaculated on magazine covers with her photographs.

“I shouldn’t have to be completely broken, battered, and devalued in order to prove that he crossed a line,” Munn told the Times.

Ratner’s attorney, Martin Singer, said that the director “vehemently disputes” Munn’s allegations.

Actress Natasha Henstridge told the Times that in the early 90s, when she was 19 years old and working as a model (and Ratner was in his early 20s), he forced her to perform oral sex on him in his New York City apartment.

“He strong-armed me in a real way,” Henstridge told the Times. “He physically forced himself on me. At some point, I gave in and he did his thing.” Ratner denied this ever happened, through his attorney.

Henstridge, now 43, told the Times that she has crossed paths with Ratner a lot at Hollywood parties and events. Henstridge also told the Times that she auditioned for the show “Prison Break” knowing that, as an executive producer, Ratner would likely be in the room. He was, she said.

“I had two young kids and had to go to work and make a living,” she said. “And he just acted like we were old friends from back in the day in New York, saying, ‘I haven’t seen you in years.’ Auditioning is already bad enough. But trying to focus on the work, I just felt sick.” Henstridge didn’t get the part she auditioned for on “Prison Break.”

Multiple extras on Ratner’s film “Rush Hour 2” told the Times that he sexually harassed them. One, Eri Sasaki, said that Ratner approached her one day on set, ran his finger down her bare stomach, and asked if she wanted to go to the bathroom with him. Sasaki said that when she said no, Ratner asked, “Don’t you want to be famous?”

Ratner’s attorney said that Ratner does not recall Sasaki’s story.

Another extra, Jorina King, said Ratner came to her trailer and requested to see her breasts. King said she said no and hid in the bathroom.

“I figured if I could stay out of his eyesight, if I could stay away from him, he will forget about me and he will choose someone else, and that is exactly what happened,” she told the Times.

Ratner’s attorney, Martin Singer, responded to Business Insider’s request for comment via email Wednesday afternoon:

“Brett Ratner vehemently denies the outrageous derogatory allegations that have been reported about him, and we are confident that his name will be cleared once the current media frenzy dies down and people can objectively evaluate the nature of these claims. He understands the seriousness of this issue and the importance of addressing the concerns of victims of sexual misconduct both in the entertainment industry and beyond.”

Read the full investigation from the LA Times.