Singapore’s anti-corruption watchdog records all-time low of 103 cases registered for investigation in 2017

CPIB said that private sector cases continued to form the majority of all cases registered for investigation, although the number remained low.
The Straits Times

The number of corruption cases registered for investigation last year fell to 103, an all-time low, reported Singapore’s anti-corruption watchdog in its annual statistics released on Wednesday (April 11).

The Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) said that it received a total of 778 complaints – which comprise both corruption-related and non-corruption-related ones – in 2017, a 3.7% drop from the 808 complaints the previous year.

All complaints are evaluated and a case is registered for investigation if the information received is pursuable. In 2016, 118 cases were registered for investigation.

The majority of cases complaints which were not pursued were due to insufficient, vague or unsubstantiated information provided and such cases are referred to relevant government agencies, if applicable.

Last year, 410 or 53% of the 778 complaints were classified as non-corruption complaints. This was 45% in 2016 and 46% in 2015.

CPIB said that private sector cases continued to form the majority (92%) of all cases registered for investigation, although the number remained low.

Of these cases, 10% involved public sector employees rejecting bribes offered by private individuals.

The proportion of public sector cases, which remained low, accounted for 8% of all cases registered for investigation last year, compared to 15% in 2016.

Areas which CPIB said continue to be a of concern over the last three years comprise construction, wholesale and retail businesses, and warehousing, transport and logistics services. Cases in these sectors generally involved bribery in exchange for business contracts.

A breakdown of the cases registered for investigation by type of sector.
CPIB

Private sector employees also made up 94% of the 141 people charged in court for cases investigated by the CPIB last year, which is a 32% increase from 2016. .

However, the increase in prosecution is attributed to cases involving multiple accused persons who were charged in court last year and not because of an increase in the number of cases, said CPIB.

Public and private sector employees prosecuted in court.
CPIB