Step inside Spotify’s New York City office, where you’ll find an airy roof deck, cold brew coffee, and a secret recording studio

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Employees work and socialize on Spotify’s expansive roof deck.
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Tanza Loudenback/Business Insider

Ten-year-old music streaming giant Spotify is the veritable veteran in the digital music wars.

With more than 100 million users – 30 million of which pay $10 per month for the service’s premium, ad-free version – Spotify continues to dominate despite the arrival of formidable competitors like Apple Music.

The Stockholm, Sweden-based company is expected to go public some time in 2017. Last year, Spotify sales reached $2.2 billion, about $1.8 billion of which went to record labels and talent, reports Bloomberg. Nonetheless, the company is growing rapidly with a focus on research and product development, including video experimentation.

Business Insider was recently invited to tour the company’s US headquarters in New York City. Check out the highlights from our visit below.


Welcome to Spotify’s US headquarters in New York City’s Flatiron District. The streaming giant occupies two floors covering a total of 140,000 square feet. Three years ago, the company renovated the 90,000 square-foot 7th floor.

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A door on the 7th floor leads to the wifi-enabled roof deck, a favorite common space among employees.

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Our tour guide and the company’s interior designer Cecilia Vigil said she decorated the rooftop with plants and flowers reminiscent of her native Sweden (the company’s cofounder and CEO Daniel Ek is also Swedish).

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Vigil said that each of the two floors has a different theme: one is song titles, and one is music venues. Below is the entrance to the 3rd floor library — named after a 1970’s Paul Simon hit — the only “no talking allowed” room in the office, she said.

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Several NYC-based artists painted portraits of their favorite poets for the walls of the library.

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Near the library is the workshop, where employees are welcome to tinker with tools or 3-D printers at any time of the day.

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The entrance to the 50,000 square-foot 3rd floor — which was renovated about a year and a half ago — is a sultry lounge area with an extensive library of records and a vintage player.

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A nondescript door in the corner of the room leads to a private “research lab” where the company tests Spotify products on users. Also tucked away on the 3rd floor is a wellness room — a windowless escape with a small bed and armchair. Vigil said it’s used mostly by new mothers or employees with young kids. Employees have access to showers and big lockers as well.

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Each floor is made up of three elements: open desk space, common areas, and meeting rooms. For the most part, Vigil explained, the meeting rooms and desk clusters line the perimeter of each floor, while the common spaces and lounge areas are at the center. Booths — for eating or working — are part of the 3rd floor common space.

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Up on the 7th floor is the office’s best-kept secret: the newly-minted recording studio.

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The cozy studio — complete with top-of-the-line instruments — is used for recording Spotify original content, a producer named Bryan told us.

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Though Bryan said acts including Local Natives, Margaret Glaspy, and Diplo have had sessions in the months-old studio, it’s still relatively unknown. “Right now, it feels like our own little Narnia.”

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Just behind the 7th floor lobby is a large gathering area that’s frequently used for band performances and town hall-style meetings, Vigil said.

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Covering the walls are drum heads signed by recording artists including chart-toppers like Joss Stone and Nate Ruess.

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There’s also a fully stocked kitchen and bar in the room — one of several throughout the office. Each kitchen has an extensive snack section, and there’s cold brew coffee on tap. A small menu of dishes is available to employees every day and on Fridays there are company-wide catered lunches.

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During our visit, most employees were scattered throughout the office working on laptops or meeting with colleagues. The 3rd floor common area — with picnic tables and stadium-style cushioned seating — was no exception. The screen at the front of the room is often used for movie nights, Vigil said.

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Another kitchen sits adjacent to the common area with more than a dozen transparent snack dispensers filled with everything from yogurt pretzels to pistachios. Vigil pointed out three covered dispensers at the end of the line filled with M&Ms, trail mix, and dark chocolate-covered almonds. Vigil said they’re testing the theory that people are less tempted to eat sweets if they don’t see them. So far, the theory holds true, she said.

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About 600 employees work out of the New York office. And each department or “squad” — from ad sales to marketing to engineering and development — has its own personalized open area desk space.

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Vigil commissioned artists to paint several walls in the office with images illustrating “the essence of New York City.”

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The theme of the meeting rooms on the 7th floor is music venues. Here’s Studio 54, the famous 1970’s NYC nightclub.

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As you head back out the door, an exhaustive timeline of the company runs along the back wall of the 7th floor lobby highlighting events like partnership and subscriber milestones by the million.

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