4 ways your freezing office is sabotaging your success

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Is your boss secretly the Night King?
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HBO

Does it ever feel like White Walkers have seized control of the thermostat in your office?

During the warmer months, workplaces tend to ramp up the AC. In fact, Co.Design reports that 60% of workers said they were too hot or cold in a study of government office buildings.

Your freezing office could actually be sabotaging your professional success.

Here a few ways in which the cold undermines your work performance:


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emdot/flickr

The cold slows down your work

Chilly temperatures lead to overly chill workers. That’s because when you’re cold, there comes a point where all you want to do is throw on a snuggie and drink tea. That’s obviously not a great mindset for productivity. Plus, typing with cold fingers is the absolute worst.


The cold makes you gain weight

As Business Insider recently reported, American workers are already facing weight gain in the office – and cold temperatures aren’t helping matters.

An article in Everyday Health notes that air conditioning keeps bodies in a “thermoneutral zone” where we don’t need to work to stay comfortable. This reduces the number of calories we burn and may make us want to eat more.


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Toshihiro Oimatsu/Flickr

The cold makes you unhappy

Cold hands, warm heart? Not so fast.

Experts published a 2008 study in Science magazine saying that most people draw a link between physical and interpersonal warmth. In summary, people that are freezing tend to see others as less nice.

So if you feel like all your coworkers hate you, maybe you just need to get someone to turn down the AC.


The cold makes you more error-prone

Frigid work conditions are linked to individuals making more mistakes.

Ron Friedman wrote in Fast Company that Cornell researchers discovered that employees committed 44% more errors at an office temperature of 68 degrees than at 77 degrees.

So next time your boss complains about a mistake you made, ask him to turn up the thermostat a few degrees. (No, don’t actually do that.)