The king of NYC’s power lunch is gone — here are the restaurants that could take the throne

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Vaucluse

The Four Seasons Restaurant has closed after over 50 years of welcoming New York’s elite into its ethereal dining room.

So now, after weeks of parties in which people jumped into the restaurant’s famed pool, dined on food prepared by celebrity chefs, and generally mourned the passing of a legend, one thing remains: You still have to go somewhere to power lunch.

While we cannot bring back The Four Seasons, we can make a few suggestions as to where you might sit in a space that has something of the same transcendental quality.

They also happen to be spots where power lunchers already make reservations. Those are just going to be a little harder to get now.


Vaucluse at 100 E. 63rd St.

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Vaucluse

Vaucluse is fairly new in the New York City dining scene, having opened in fall 2015. A French restaurant from Chef Michael White, who is better known for Italian fare, boasts the added draw of a perfectly reimagined, two-dining-room space.

The location used to house another restaurant on this list, Park Avenue Summer, but White changed the tone into something bright and classic. Plus, the private dining space is killer.


American Cut Midtown at 109 E. 56th St.

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American Cut

A Tribeca hit, American Cut heads uptown. The Midtown dining room has been appropriately kicked up a notch for the power-dining set. The furniture says classic Gotham, but look at the art on the walls and you’ll notice a grittier touch.


Milos at 125 W. 55th St.

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Milos, Facebook

Milos is known for being out of reach for most at dinnertime. At midday, though, the restaurant serves the lunch set with a reasonable prix fixe, which means you get to hang out in this epic dining room with all its natural light and high ceilings.


The Garden in The Four Seasons at 57 E. 57th St.

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Four Seasons

Not to be confused with our dearly departed The Four Seasons Restaurant, The Garden at the Four Seasons Hotel is a quieter affair.

But the trees sure do add a nice touch.


A Voce, 10 Columbus Circle, 3rd Floor

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A Voce’s Facebook page

There are many upscale New York City Italian experiences. Not all of them come with this view from the Time Warner Center in Columbus Circle.

We should note that the lunch prix fixe is incredibly reasonable – just $35 for three courses. The restaurant also has some great private space in case you need to have a quiet meeting with a larger group.


Marea at 240 Central Park S.

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The dining room at Marea
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Altamarea Group

The crowd in Marea at lunchtime is a who’s who of Wall Street, media, business, and New York politics. The waiters are very conscious of this. The New York Times once reported that the restaurant tracks its customers down to who they can and cannot put in the same seating area – for example, rival investing legends Bill Ackman and Carl Icahn are, as a rule, seated apart.

Also, there’s Chef Michael White’s famous fusilli with baby octopus and bone marrow, which has become one of New York City’s classics.


Michael’s at 24 W. 55th St.

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Michael’s NYC on Facebook

Another place to see and be seen, Michael’s used to cater mostly to the media set, but now you might catch anyone in NYC’s power-dining circle there.

Two years ago, The New York Post reported on the restaurant’s secret seating chart. According the story, media types (like, say, Oprah) like to sit in the front, whereas hedge fund and Wall Street types like to sit in the back.


The Clocktower at 5 Madison Ave.

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The Clocktower

The Clocktower is another fairly new restaurant for the power-lunch scene, and you may want to take advantage of that. Not only does the restaurant have a solid lunch prix fixe, but it also turns into a super hot spot at night.

Get a reservation during the day and miss the evening mayhem while enjoying the richly decorated dining room.


Jean Georges at 1 Central Park West

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Jean Georges

Jean-Georges Vongerichten is an institution in this town, so it’s only fitting that sitting in his namesake restaurant is something worth writing about.

The lunch menu there will cost you a cool $58. That’s after two price hikes since 2014. It’s up to you whether or not you think three Michelin stars are worth the price.


Park Avenue Summer at 360 Park Ave. South

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Park Avenue Summer’s Facebook page

Despite leaving its home on the Upper East Side for Flatiron, Park Avenue has kept up with its concept.

The restaurant changes its decor and menu with the seasons, and it can get pretty epic in there. Of course, now the clientele is a little different. Flatiron is home to New York City’s tech scene and just one bank – Credit Suisse.


The Hunt & Fish Club at 125 W. 44th St.

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Hunt & Fish Club

At dinner at The Hunt & Fish Club, you may run into a reality-TV taping (the Kardashians, Real Housewives, etc.), a bunch of current and/or retired New York City athletes, or random celebrities like Paula Abdul or John Cena.

At lunch, though, you’ll probably just see a bunch of Wall Street-ers chowing down on steak. Try the popovers that come out fresh and hot at the start of your meal – or don’t, because they’re addictive.


Limani at 45 Rockefeller Plaza

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Limani NYC’s Facebook page

This is the East Side’s answer to Milos. Same fresh Greek fare, a similar prix fixe lunch menu, and more sky-high ceilings and light everywhere.

Also, like Milos, Limani caters to a Midtown lunch set that needs to get in and out fairly quickly, but still want an elegant vibe and attentive service.


The Sea Grill at Rockefeller Center

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The Sea Grill

Watch the goings-on at Rockefeller Center from the safety of this subterranean restaurant, which was designed by Adam Tihany, one of the most iconic restaurant designers in NYC.

Tihany is world renowned, and it has partnered with a bunch of the city’s celebrity chefs through the years, including Daniel Boulud, Thomas Keller, Heston Blumenthal and Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

At The Sea Grill, he created the best experience to watch the Rockefeller skating rink – one where you don’t have to be outside at all.


Del Frisco’s at 1221 Avenue of the Americas

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Robert Libetti/ Business Insider

Another Wall Street classic, Del Frisco’s is one of those places where the bartenders will remember your name if you’re there enough. It’s one of those places with off-menu cake. It’s one of those places where New York City athletes get standing ovations when they try to come in quietly through the back door.

It happened to Jeremy Lin once.


Gabriel Kreuther at 41 W. 42nd St.

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Gabriel Kruether’s Facebook page

Another 2015 addition to New York City’s epic dining rooms, Gabriel Kreuther is named after its head chef, who formerly helmed The Modern at the Museum of Modern Art.

Located in Bryant Park, the space was designed by Glen & Company Architecture and got attention from the design world upon its open.