Here’s the list of 15 powerhouse European executives who had dinner with Trump at Davos

President Donald Trump and members of his administration met with the heads of 15 European companies during his trip to the World Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland.

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President Donald Trump and members of his administration met with the heads of 15 European companies during his trip to the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland.
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Carlos Barria/Reuters

  • President Donald Trump and members of his administration had dinner with the heads of 15 European companies during his trip to the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland.
  • They focused on deregulation policies in a roundtable modeled after CEO meetings Trump had in his first few months of office.
  • Trump’s chief economic adviser Gary Cohn said the main purpose of the dinner is to encourage doing business in the US.

President Donald Trump arrived at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, on Thursday to pitch to the global elite reasons America is great again.

He’s the first US president in 20 years to attend the event.

Ahead of his speech on Friday, Trump had dinner with 15 heads of European companies across various industries, including the CEOs of Adidas, Deloitte, and Nestlé.

The dinner was modeled on the CEO roundtables of his first few months in office, which were later disbanded due to controversial remarks the president made about a violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Trump was joined by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielson, national security adviser Gen. H.R. McMaster, and National Economic Council director Gary Cohn.

Of the dinner’s guests, Cohn told reporters in Davos, “The attendees run companies that have sizeable footprints in the United States. They have invested in our economy. We want them to continue to do so and encourage others to join them.”

Cohn explained that Trump planned on using the dinner to explain that the US has a reinvigorated business environment due to his administration’s new tax and deregulation policies.


Kasper Rørsted, CEO of Adidas — Germany

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Reuters/Wolfgang Rattay

Rørsted has led Adidas, the world’s second-largest sportswear manufacturer, since 2016.


Joe Kaeser, CEO of Siemens — Germany

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Michael Dalder/Reuters

Kaesar has been head of Siemens, Europe’s largest industrial manufacturing company, since 2013, and was part of German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s delegation during her first White House visit of the Trump presidency in March 2017.


Heinrich Hiesinger, CEO of thyssenkrupp — Germany

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Since 2011, Hiesinger has been CEO of thyssenkrupp, one of the world’s largest steel producers.


Eldar Sætre, CEO of Statoil — Norway

Sætre has led Statoil since 2015. Statoil is one of the world’s largest oil and gas companies and the Norwegian government is its majority shareholder.


Ulf Mark Schneider. CEO of Nestlé — Switzerland

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Pierre Albouy/Reuters

Scheider has been CEO of Nestlé since Jan. 1, 2017. Nestlé is the largest food company in the world.


Vas Narasimhan, incoming CEO of Novartis — Switzerland

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Reuters

Narasimhan, previously the global head of drug development at pharmaceutical giant Novartis, will become CEO of the company on Feb. 1 of this year.


Mark Tucker, chairman of HSBC — United Kingdom

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Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters

Tucker has been the chairman of HSBC, one of the world’s largest banks, since Sept. 2017.


Patrick Pouyanné, CEO of Total — France

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REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

Pouanné has led oil and gas giant Total since 2015.


Carlos Brito, CEO of Anheuser-Busch InBev — Belgium

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Eric Vidal/Reuters

Brito became the CEO of Brazilian brewing company AmBev in 2004. The company went on to acquire American brewers Anheuser-Busch and SABMiller, making it the world’s largest brewer, and established headquarters in Belgium.


Rajeev Suri, CEO of Nokia — Finland

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Albert Gea/Reuters

Suri has been the CEO of mobile company Nokia since 2014.


Punit Renjen, CEO of Deloitte — United Kingdom

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Deloitte CEO Punit Renjen
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Deloitte US/YouTube

Renjen has been the global head of the professional services company Deloitte since 2015.


Martin Lundstedt, CEO of Volvo — Sweden

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Noella Johansson/TT News Agency via Reuters

Lundstedt has led automotive giant Volvo since 2015.


Werner Baumann, CEO of Bayer — Germany

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Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters

Baumann has been head of Bayer, the big pharma company, since 2016.


Bill McDermott, CEO of SAP — Germany

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Ralph Orlowski/Reuters

McDermott became the CEO of enterprise software company SAP in 2014, becoming the first American to hold the title.


Ulrich Spiesshofer, CEO of ABB Group — Switzerland

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Denis Balibouse/Reuters

Spiesshofer has been CEO of ABB Group since 2013. It is one of the world’s largest engineer companies as well as one of the world’s largest conglomerates.