A mini-golf bar packed with pop culture references is opening in Clarke Quay – and it’s absolutely made for Insta

Holey Moley Singapore was designed to be Instagram-friendly, Funlab CEO Michael Schreiber said.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Australian entertainment company Funlab, owner of 11 mini-golf bars, is opening its largest outlet yet in Clarke Quay.

The two-storey mini-golf bar is named Holey Moley and was designed as as highly-Instagrammable experience. It sits on the spot last occupied by Shanghai Dolly, a Mandopop nightclub.

This is the Funlab’s first foray into the Asia market. The company also owns Strike Bowling Bars, Sky Zone, Archie Brothers Cirque Electric and B.Lucky & Sons.

Combined with Holey Moley, these concepts comprise a total of 30 outlets worldwide, and are expected to collectively rake in A$125 million (S$123 million) of revenue in 2019.

I took a tour of the lavishly decorated venue, with Funlab CEO Michael Schreiber tagging along to demonstrate how to have fun at the 17,352 square feet venue.

Here’s what it was like inside:


The entire floor of the building was covered in fake grass to make it feel like a golf course. At the entrance was the registration counter.

Holy Moley Singapore cost A$4.5 million (S$4.46 million) and took three months to build, Schreiber said.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Beside the registration counter was a photo taking spot – the first of many – comprising a neon sign and a golf cart perfect for the ‘gram.

Rachel Genevieve Chia

I picked up a club and some balls for the mini-golf game before heading in. 

Each round of mini-golf is played on a fixed course of nine holes. Players can choose between one round (nine holes, S$20), two rounds (18 holes, S$38) or all 27 holes, (S$50). Prices are lower if you play before 4pm.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

I also got a lanyard with paper and pen to track the scores.

Mini-golf is usually played in groups of four.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

The first set of nine holes was down a leafy corridor and past the bar area.

Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Time to play: We entered the first hole to look for the tee-off point, which was marked by a white line.

This hole was inspired by The Wizard of Oz.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

This particular course contained three holes designed especially for Singapore. The first one, called Golfzilla, featured Godzilla attacking a Marina Bay Sands replica made out of lego.

The ball needs to go around lego Godzilla and to the other side of MBS to reach the flag.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Instructions and tips were mounted on a board near the tee-off point. 

The par value on the top left tells you ideally how many shots you should get the ball into the hole by. The more shots you take, the worse your performance.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

The second Singapore-exclusive hole, Did Someone Say Dinner? was inspired by hawker centres. It’s set up upside down.

Schreiber said all 27 holes are custom-designed. They took three months to build and had to be shipped in to Singapore from Australia, as there was no local company that could make them.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

This hawker centre came complete with tissue paper on the seats.

Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

The final Singapore-inspired hole, called The Designated Driver, was based off the F1 Grand Prix night race.

Unlike a typical course, there was space for four players to tee-off at once.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Players competed against each other to get the ball into the hole the fastest.

Not all holes involve hitting the ball around the course – some require gameplay.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

As a bonus, there was also a Singapore Monopoly-themed hole, with Queenstown and Bishan listed on the tiles.

You start in “jail”.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

The Monopoly hole came with extra-large tokens of a house and hotel.

Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

There was a Flintstones-themed hole, complete with neolithic golf caddy.

You need to putt the ball under the caddy, through the bones, and to the flag.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

On to the second round of nine holes. Highlights from these included a Jaws-themed hole…

Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

CEO Schreiber tried out a popular pose.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

… and a hole featuring the DeLorean from Back To the Future.

Also: the added challenge of putting the ball while posing on a static hoverboard.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

For this set of nine holes, players enter a darkroom to play the final three holes. Everything was glow-in-the-dark. 

Including a hole inspired by the beloved ’90s game, Pac Man.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Everything was dark – which made it more challenging.

While we played, neon lights bounced off the walls.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

The third set of holes were on the second floor. There was a Tetris-themed hole…

Punnily named “Teetris”.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

… and a hole inspired by the Japanese game Pachinko.

Very retro.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

One hole lets you play in the Simpsons’ own living room.

Holes will be changed every year so returning customers won’t need to keep playing the same courses.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

You could fly home with ET, or rule Westeros.

The Game of Thrones hole is one of the hardest to score – you need to hit the ball from the floor up into the centre of the Iron Throne.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

After we played, we had some food and drinks at the bar.

There are two bars. This was located on the second floor.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Down the stairs to the first floor was another Instagram spot.

Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

The bar on the first floor had various seating areas.

The entire venue can fit 450 people. Schreiber said Holy Moley Singapore had already been booked for A$100,000 (S$99,000) worth of private functions, even before opening its doors.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Sixty staff members run the Singapore outlet, Schreiber said.

Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

There was a third bar area with more seats.

Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Much like the mini-golf courses, Holey Moley’s food was also designed for Instagram – particularly its cocktails.

From left: “Shark Tanq”, “Sugar Caddy”, “Candy Man” and “Electric Blue”.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

There’s also a massive Monster Gold Burger (S$99), which the server told me could be shared between two hungry patrons – or four small eaters.

The burger bun was  sprayed gold. Sandwiched inside was a one-kilogram beef patty topped topped with pulled beef brisket.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

Other dishes include The Dirty Dog (a loaded hot dog), truffle fries, a one-metre-long Mega Pizza, and a green burger.

Despite the name, it contained meat.
Rachel Genevieve Chia/Business Insider

CEO Schreiber said that while Holey Moley caters primarily to millennials and their desire for Instagrammable experiences, the mini-golf bar was also designed as a “counterpoint to digital life” by having patrons mingle and make friends while drinking and playing.

Themed holes also give customers “nostalgic experiences that can’t be replicated just by going on the Internet”, he said.

Schreiber added that Holey Moley Singapore was set up to test the Asian market’s receptiveness to the mini-golf bar concept.

If Clarke Quay’s outlet is successful, Funlab plans to make the republic the company’s Asia headquarters, with tentative plans for expansion into Japan, South Korea, or China.

Read also: