A powerful new card will let users pay for parking, ERP and highway tolls in both Singapore and Malaysia

The card will hold two electronic wallets, one for EZ-Link (containing Singapore dollars) and one for Touch ‘n Go (containing Malaysian ringgit).
The Straits Times

Frequently travel between Singapore and Malaysia? You’ll want to get a piece of this.

Singapore’s EZ-Link and Malaysia’s Touch ‘n Go have partnered up to launch a dual-currency Combi Card that will let users pay for travel in both countries.

To start with, the card can be used to pay for parking, highway tolls in Malaysia, and ERP fares in Singapore.

EZ-Link

It will be launched near the end of 2019, the companies said in a joint statement on Tuesday (April 9). They previously signed a Memorandum of Understanding on the project in 2017.

The card will hold two electronic wallets, one for EZ-Link (containing Singapore dollars) and one for Touch ‘n Go (containing Malaysian ringgit).

According to a report by The Straits Times (ST), users must pay for Malaysian transactions with ringgit, and Singapore transactions with Singapore dollars. They cannot, for example, use ringgit to pay for a Singapore transaction if their Singapore dollars balance in the card is zero.

Details like how to top up the card will be released at a later date, ST said.

EZ-Link CEO Nicholas Lee added that in the future, users can use the card to pay for shopping and dining.

NETS and MyDebit cards to be accepted in both countries

Another partnership between NETS Singapore and PayNet Malaysia will allow Singaporeans to pay with their NETS ATM cards in Malaysia, and Malaysians to pay with MyDebit ATM Cards in Singapore.

Singapore’s NETS cards are already being accepted at 3,500 points in Malaysia, and MyDebit ATM Cards will be accepted in Singapore from by September this year, according to a joint statement from Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad and Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Tuesday (Apr 9).

Read also: 4 key things that came out of the meeting between Singapore’s PM Lee and Malaysia’s PM Mahathir