A Singaporean man is wanted by Malaysian police, while another has been charged in relation to the toxic pollution at Sungai Kim Kim

 

 The suspect is believed to be one of the owners of the factories allegedly responsible for dumping toxic waste into Sungai Kim Kim
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A Singaporean man in his 30s is wanted by the Johor police in connection to the Sungai Kim Kim pollution case, The Star reported today (March 25).

He is believed to be one of the owners of the factories allegedly responsible for dumping toxic waste into Sungai Kim Kim, added The Star.

In a report, the New Straits Times quoted the Johor Police chief, Comm Datuk Mohd Khalil Kader Mohd, as saying that the Johor State Police would be working closely with the Singaporean police to locate the man.

It also quoted him as saying: “We are tracking down the man and will be conducting further investigation in this case.”

When contacted, the Singapore Police Force (SPF) told Business Insider that it was in touch with the Royal Malaysia Police, and are waiting for an official request for assistance to be made.

“We are unable to comment further as investigations by the Malaysian authorities are ongoing,” a SPF spokesperson said.

In response to accusations by the public that the police were not doing a proper job, he responded: “The police cannot just arrest a person without proper conduct, investigation and evidence.”

A day earlier, another Singaporean man, Wang Jin Chao, 34, was charged with involvement in the Sungai Kim Kim, according to The Star.

Two others, Malaysians Yap Yoke Liang, 36, and lorry driver N. Maridass, 35, were also charged.

According to The Star, the police chief told reporters at a press conference on Sunday: “The most important thing is we have managed to apprehend the three main suspects in this case.”

Since the incident was reported on March 7, a total of 5,848 children and adults have been treated at clinics and hospitals after inhaling toxic fumes from the pollution, The Star reported.

In total, 2.43 tonnes of chemical waste were collected from the river on the day the incident was reported.

These chemicals were then washed downstream, polluting the air with toxic gas. Residents and students located in the Paris Gudang area reportedly vomited and fainted as a result.

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