A spa-like yoga studio that C-suite execs love just opened a massive outlet at Raffles Place – here’s what it’s like inside

The 13,000 square foot outlet spans an entire floor of Republic Plaza building.
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What does a banker do after a stressful morning at work?

According to the clientele of one yoga studio, the answer is a good stretching session instead of lunch.

Pure Yoga, a yoga chain with studios in Shanghai, Hong Kong, Beijing and New York, just opened its second-largest Singapore outlet in Raffles Place on Thursday (Jan 24) for office workers to unwind.

The new outlet is designed to be a “sanctuary” amid the busy CBD, where execs can “tune out the demands of their stressful world” through yoga and meditation, the company said.

Despite having an existing outlet nearby in Asia Square, the company decided to open a second, bigger outlet due to “high demand” in the area, as well as to replace a closed outlet at Chevron House.

The 13,000 square foot outlet spans an entire floor of Republic Plaza building. It’s got a meditation space, Instagram wall, and yoga rooms that can hold up to 50 people at once.

Here’s what it’s like inside:


Pure Yoga’s newest outlet at Raffles Place spans the ninth floor of Republic Plaza, which is nestled among offices in the CBD.

According to Vikram Natarajan, Pure Group’s country director for Singapore, the team took several months to find a location, and the studio cost “a few million dollars” to set up.

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The brand does not open “small” studios, Natarajan said, adding that the new outlet’s size is between 13,000 to 14,000 square feet.

The size of Pure Yoga’s three other outlets range between 10,000 to 15,000 square feet, he added, with the largest being the outlet at Ngee Ann City.

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There’s a reception area near the entrance, where members sign in to use the facility. Pure Yoga declined to reveal how much membership costs, but forums online mention prices between S$150 and S$190 a month.

Non-members can also walk in to attend classes – which will cost S$53.50 per class.

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Most of the reception area is taken up by an open lounge, with sofas, tables, and WiFi. In the cramped CBD, this spacious lounge is meant to feel especially luxurious, according to Pure Group’s regional marketing director, Gary Wise.

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Windows line one wall, with views of the CBD. A significant number of Pure Yoga’s clients are bankers, C-suite execs and board members who see the benefits of yoga and meditation in de-stressing, Wise told Business Insider.

Fifteen-minute meditation sessions at lunch hour are popular among this group due to their busy schedules, he added.
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There are sofas along the walls for guests to relax and recline with a drink and a magazine.

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While attending yoga classes, customers can charge their phones in lockers with in-built chargers and cables for both Apple and Android phones.

The studio has a policy that does not allow mobile phones to be brought into the yoga rooms.
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In a corner of the lounge is a refreshment area selling refreshments from Nood, the company’s F&B business.

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Next to it is a small area selling Pure Apparel products, like yoga clothes and equipment.

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On to the outlet’s main feature: four large yoga rooms that fit 50 people at once. Two rooms can be combined to create a studio big enough for 100.

This studio contains equipment for aerial yoga.
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Hidden cupboards along the wall contain equipment like foam blocks. Yoga mats are also provided, as well as unlimited towels.

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One major draw of the yoga rooms is the lack of pillars, meaning the space feels bigger.

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Then are two smaller rooms, including this room for rope yoga.

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The other is a meditation room, where audio-guided meditation sessions are run at regular intervals.

The bowls in the middle are crystal singing bowls meant to help with meditation.
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Near each room, there’s a shoe rack and bench.

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The rooms are all linked by long, dim corridors that run the circumference of the floor.

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There’s even an Instagram corner with props for photo taking.

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After a sweaty session, it’s time to hit the shower: this outlet has a fancy, country-club like toilet that’s absolutely cavernous.

There are lockers with hangers for clothes and belongings, as well as benches that double up as shoe racks.
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Piles of fluffy white towels are free to use, just like in a spa.

There’s also a spin dryer.
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There are multiple shower areas, and each comes with toiletries.

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There’s also various vanity areas. Each station comes with a hairdryer and hairbrush, hair gel and moisturiser.

As well as cotton buds and cotton pads for applying makeup.
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