Greek police have found the body of an American scientist who went missing while attending a conference last week

Suzanne Eaton

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Suzanne Eaton
source
Courtesy of Suzanne Eaton’s family

  • The body of American biologist Suzanne Eaton, 59, was found in a cave in Chania, Crete, on Monday night.
  • She was last seen on July 2 at the Orthodox Academy in northwest Crete, in the village of Kolymbari, while attending a conference on the island.
  • Eaton, who worked at the Max Planck Institute at Dresden University in Germany, was thought to have gone on a routine run when she went missing, according to a Facebook page titled, “Searching for Suzanne,” which was set up by her family.
  • Eaton’s family said her passport, wallet, phone, cash, and cycling shoes were found in her room at the Orthodox Academy, but her running shoes were missing.
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Greek authorities have found the body of an American scientist who went missing while attending a conference on the island of Crete last week.

Police discovered the body of Suzanne Eaton, 59, in a cave in Chania, Crete, on Monday evening, CBS News reported.

Eaton was last seen on July 2 while attending a conference at the Orthodox Academy in northwest Crete, in the village of Kolymbari.

The molecular biologist, who works at the Max Planck Institute at Dresden University in Germany, is believed to have gone on a routine run when she went missing, according to a Facebook page titled, “Searching for Suzanne,” which was set up by her family.

Eaton’s family said her passport, wallet, phone, cash, and cycling shoes were found in her room at the Orthodox Academy, but her running shoes were missing.

“Due to the rough terrain and extreme heat, we believe the most likely possibility is that Suzanne may have either become overheated and looked for shade or that she may have fallen,” the Facebook page said.

Eaton’s family said she runs for 30 minutes every day, and had done the same on the day before her disappearance.

Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics confirmed to CBS News that Eaton’s body had been found on Monday.

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“The authorities have not yet completed their investigation regarding the events that may have transpired on Tuesday afternoon, 2nd July, and we will provide further updates as we receive information,” the institute said. “Suzanne was an outstanding and inspiring scientist, a loving spouse and mother, an athlete as well as a truly wonderful person beloved to us all. Her loss is unbearable. Our thoughts and prayers are with her husband Tony, her sons Max and Luke, and with all her family.”

Eaton was married to British scientist Tony Hyman and had two sons.

Max Planck Institute previously said that Eaton’s friends had offered a 50,000 euro ($56,000) reward for information leading to Eaton being found.

By Monday night, the Searching for Suzanne campaign had raised more than $40,000 to pay for additional search costs.