Princess Nokia thinks Ariana Grande’s new song ‘7 Rings’ sounds ‘really familiar’ and implied the singer stole her style

Princess Nokia, born Destiny Frasqueri, is an American rapper of Puerto Rican descent.

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Princess Nokia, born Destiny Frasqueri, is an American rapper of Puerto Rican descent.
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Scott Dudelson/Getty Images

  • Ariana Grande released a new song Friday morning called “7 Rings,” along with an accompanying music video.
  • The song was inspired by the time Grande spontaneously bought seven diamond rings for herself and six friends. Four of those friends are credited as co-writers on the track.
  • Princess Nokia posted a video on Twitter comparing “7 Rings” to her 2016 song “Mine.”
  • “That sounds really familiar to me,” she says in the video. “Wait, ain’t that the little song I made about brown women and their hair? Hm, sounds about white.”
  • Many fans on Twitter seem to agree with her, while others have noted that similar flows and lyrics have been interpolated many times before.

Princess Nokia recently posted a video comparing Ariana Grande’s new single “7 Rings” with her own 2016 song “Mine,” heavily implying that Grande ripped off her style.

“That sounds really familiar to me,” she says in the video. “Wait, ain’t that the little song I made about brown women and their hair? Hm, sounds about white.”

Grande dropped the hip-hop infused “7 Rings” on Friday, which is the third single from her upcoming album, “Thank U, Next.” It was inspired by the time Grande had “too much champagne” and spontaneously bought seven diamond rings for herself and six friends.

“You like my hair? Gee thanks, just bought it. I see it, I like it, I want it, I got it,” Grande sings in In “7 Rings.”

The chorus of Princess Nokia’s “Mine” repeats the phrase, “It’s mine, I bought it,” over a similar beat. The song also references buying hair like Grande’s song and appears to allude to the cultural significance of hair for black and brown women: “How we choose to wear our hair is our personal choice, ok? We bought it, it’s ours.”

Okayplayer music editor Ivie Ani noted that Nokia’s argument seems to be “more about the hair lyric/content than the flow.”

“I think ppl’s concern here is specific,” she wrote on Twitter. “Less about the sonic origins of ‘spend it’/’mine’ & more about the context of Ariana being white & rapping about buying hair and Princess Nokia rapping about buying hair and the policing of+fixation with black and brown image by white ppl.”

Four of Grande’s co-ring owners, two of whom are women of color – Njomza, Kaydence, Tayla Parx, and Victoria Monét – are credited as co-writers on the track. The song’s producers, TBHits, Scootie, and Mikey Foster, are also credited as co-writers.

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The song samples “My Favorite Things” from “The Sound of Music,” interpolates The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Gimme The Loot,” and pays homage to artists like Lil Mama and Destiny’s Child.

Some listeners have noted that Grande appears to be intentionally drawing from a large swath of inspirations – possibly including Princess Nokia.

It’s certainly true that the current state of both hip-hop and pop is one of collaboration and sampling.

Similar flows and lyrics to both “7 Rings” and “Mine” have been interpolated many times before, with many citing 2 Chainz’s “Spend It” and Soulja Boy’s “Pretty Boy Swag” as more possible inspiration.

Many, however, seem to agree with Princess Nokia’s assessment of the similarities, with some going so far as to call it a “rip off” or “plagiarism.”

Neither representatives for Nokia nor Grande immediately responded to INSIDER’s request for comment.

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