8 things nominated for Golden Globes this year that critics don’t actually like

Critics don't love all of the movies and TV shows that are nominated for Golden Globes.

caption
Critics don’t love all of the movies and TV shows that are nominated for Golden Globes.
source
Niko Tavernise/Warner Bros,Apple TV Plus
  • The 2020 Golden Globe nominations were announced on Monday and some nominees have been panned by critics.
  • “The Lion King” was nominated for best animated motion picture, even though it’s received negative reviews from a large number of critics.
  • Despite mixed critical reception, “Joker” was nominated for four Golden Globes.
  • HBO’s “Game of Thrones” was nominated for a Golden Globe even though the last season of the show was its lowest-rated one yet.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more.

The 2020 Golden Globe nominations were announced on Monday, bringing an array of television shows and movies to the forefront of awards season.

However, not all of the nominees were universally beloved by critics.

Here are films and series nominated for a Golden Globe that have earned mixed praise from critics.

Note: The scores from Rotten Tomatoes were accurate at the time of publication but are subject to change.


Although critics had mixed feelings about it, “Joker” (2019) earned four Golden Globe nominations.

caption
Audiences enjoyed this more than critics did.
source
Niko Tavernise/Warner Bros

“Joker” earned a whopping four nominations: best motion picture drama, best director of a motion picture, best original score, and best performance by an actor in a motion picture – drama for Joaquin Phoenix’s role as Arthur Fleck.

Although the scale still tipped towards positive in terms of critical reception, “Joker” has a Rotten Tomatoes critical score of 69% due to mixed reviews.

In general, critics were amazed by the cinematography and vision of the film, with many reviewers noting Phoenix’s devotion to the role. Other critics weren’t as impressed, saying that “Joker” paled in comparison to the films that had influenced it.

As Matthew Rozsa of Salon wrote, “While it succeeds in aping the superficial aspects of [Martin] Scorsese’s style, ‘Joker’ lacks the intelligence or gravitas of Scorsese’s best work.”

Additionally, some critics thought that the film’s thematic messaging missed the mark.

As The New York Times critic Lawrence Ware wrote, “What the film wants to say – about mental illness or class divisions in society – is not as interesting as what it accidentally says about whiteness.”


“The Lion King” (2019) was nominated for best animated motion picture, even though it has a low critic score on Rotten Tomatoes.

caption
Some have also argued that this film doesn’t even belong in this animated category.
source
Disney

Disney’s animated remake of “The Lion King” was nominated for best animated motion picture.

And although the summer blockbuster was a big financial success for Disney, it earned a slew of negative reviews from critics, yielding a rotten score of 53% on Rotten Tomatoes.

The film’s main criticism seemed to lie in the overabundance of CGI, which aimed for hyper-realism but often left reviewers feeling uneasy.

“Where the animated original had an endearingly cheery anthropomorphism, with wide eyes and cute expressions, this lacks that,” wrote Claudia Puig for NPR’s Morning Edition. “You’re marveling at the beauty of the animals, but it just doesn’t work with the material.”

Critics also seemed disenchanted by the film’s intention alone, remarking that a remake of the 1994 original felt unnecessary.

“By this point, Disney’s do-overs feel a lot like their cash-grabby, inspiration-free ’90s direct-to-video sequels, only with vastly better production values,” wrote Matthew Lickona for the San Diego Reader.


Cate Blanchett earned a nomination for “Where’d You Go, Bernadette?” (2019) but the film itself was panned by critics.

caption
Cate Blanchett in “Where’d You Go, Bernadette?”
source
Annapurna Pictures

An adaptation of the bestselling novel, the film “Where’d You Go, Bernadette” starred Cate Blanchett as the titular Bernadette Fox.

The actress received a Golden Globe nomination for best performance by an actress in a motion picture – musical or comedy.

But critics largely disliked “Where’d You Go, Bernadette?” leading to a rotten score of 48% on Rotten Tomatoes. Reviews pointed to a slapdash script and underdeveloped characters as the film’s biggest flaws.

“The script is an insult to the principle of adaptation: All that is good in the plot has been excised in favor of the shortest route to a happy ending,” wrote critic Josephine Livingstone in her review for The New Republic.

Critics also largely agreed that Blanchett was a shining light in the film, but even so many thought that it was far from a career-best performance for the star.

“As troublesome and overstuffed as Blanchett’s performance might be, it’s also one of the few interesting things going on in this troublesome and overstuffed misfire of a book adaptation,” wrote Oliver Jones for the Observer.


“Frozen 2” (2019) earned two nominations, but some critics felt that it didn’t live up to its predecessor.

caption
Critics enjoyed it, but not nearly as much as the original.
source
Walt Disney Animation

“Frozen 2,” the follow-up to the popular Disney animated movie “Frozen” (2013), won two Golden Globe nominations: one for best animated motion picture and another for best original song.

The Disney sequel earned a rush of positive reviews and received a certified fresh rating of 77% on Rotten Tomatoes, but several film critics weren’t easily won over by the animated flick.

Some were lost from the get-go, with film critic Josh Larsen calling it a “torturously convoluted extension of an already complicated narrative.”

Others liked the first film but felt that the second fell short of the original’s sweeping narrative – “Frozen” has a 90% on Rotten Tomatoes.

“There’s magic here, and elemental spirits, but no magic and nothing elemental, metaphorically speaking,” wrote Mary Ann Johanson for the Flick Filosopher. “Rote and smaller than its predecessor. Even the songs are bland and forgettable.”


“Motherless Brooklyn” (2019) received a nomination for its moving score, but critics found little else to praise.

caption
Critics had mixed feelings about this one.
source
MWM Studios

The Edward Norton-directed drama “Motherless Brooklyn” received a Golden Globe nomination for best original score by composer Daniel Pemberton.

That said, critical reception for the film was mixed, leading to a critical score of 62% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Critics felt that the drama’s faults generally laid with Norton’s misguided ambition to make a serious nod to the film noir genre.

“Its homage to film noir is over-the-top and borderline parodic – at times, it’s more ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit?’ than ‘Chinatown,'” wrote Independent critic Clarisse Loughrey.

Still, others felt that the film suffered due to its length and cast of detached characters.

Financial Times critic Nigel Andrews called the drama a “bloated, 145-minute crime flick with a gimmicky protagonist investigating a cliché-prone murder-and-corruption plot.”


Apple TV Plus’ “The Morning Show” received three nominations even though it failed to win many critics over.

caption
Jennifer Aniston on “The Morning Show.”
source
Apple TV Plus

“The Morning Show” earned three Golden Globe nominations: best television series – drama and best performance by an actress in a television series – drama for both Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon.

But the Apple TV Plus series has a critical score of 63% on Rotten Tomatoes, with critics split on their opinion of the program.

Some reviewers stressed that the series feels like a vanity project with unrelatable material.

“This is TV about the 1% made by the 1% and produced by the ultimate 1% company, and it’s simply less interesting than the true story that it’s ripping off,” CJ Johnson wrote for Film Mafia.

Even amidst positive reviews, critics still found fault with the television series As Slate critic Willa Paskin wrote, “It’s not great, but oh, God, is it interesting.”


Netflix’s “The Politician” received two nominations for its first season, despite mixed critical reception.

caption
Ben Platt stars on the Netflix show.
source
Netflix

The Ryan Murphy dramedy series “The Politician” was nominated for best television series – musical or comedy and best performance by an actor in a television series – musical or comedy for Ben Platt’s role as Payton Hobart.

And although audiences have raved about the show, “The Politician” has a fairly low critical score of 57% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Many critics liked “The Politician” for its plucky energy and seamless cinematography, but other reviewers weren’t as charmed by the series, saying it doesn’t stack up to Murphy’s more heavy-hitting projects.

“It’s just a little lightweight, closer to ‘Glee’ or ‘The New Normal’ than it is to Murphy’s true heavy-hitters like ‘Pose’ or ‘American Crime Story,'” wrote film critic Wenlei Ma for news.com.au.

Other critics felt that the show’s primary issue was building itself around an unempathetic protagonist. “It’s a daring show that reveals right from the start how wooden and obviously constructed its central character is,” wrote Sophie Gilbert for The Atlantic.


Even though its last season was its lowest-scoring one yet, HBO’s “Game of Thrones” received a nomination.

caption
Kit Harington on the “Game of Thrones” series finale.
source
HBO

Based on the “Song of Ice and Fire” book series, the global phenomena “Game of Thrones” came to an end in 2019.

The oft-nominated series only received one nod this year, with Kit Harington nominated for best performance by an actor in a television series – drama for his role as Jon Snow.

That said, the last season was controversial among fans and divisive amidst critics.

Although every other season in the show’s run currently sits at or above 90% on Rotten Tomatoes, the show’s eighth and final season has a critical score of just 58%.

Critics felt the show’s biggest failing in season eight was that it simply did not live up to the prior near-decade of television magic.

“Season eight made the regrettable mistake of giving half its time to an underwhelming villain at the expense of the characters who made the show special in the first place,” wrote film critic Ian Thomas Malone.

“In the final six episodes, ‘Game of Thrones’ should have felt like a game of chess,” wrote Jeff York for Creative Screenwriting. “Instead, it veered very close to feeling more like a game of checkers. And that’s probably why so many viewers felt burned.”

Read More: