The Feds arrested a man accused of plotting terror attacks on the White House and other government buildings in Washington, DC

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  • Federal officials announced that the Joint Terrorism Task Force foiled a plot to attack the White House and other locations in Washington, DC.
  • A 21-year-old man, Hasher Taheb of Cumming, Georgia, was arrested and charged on Wednesday.
  • The arrest was the result of a yearlong investigation. Authorities said “all potential threats have been neutralized and under control from the inception of this case.”
  • Investigators opened the case after receiving a tip about Taheb.

Federal officials announced Wednesday that the Joint Terrorism Task Force foiled a plot to attack the White House and other locations in Washington, DC.

A 21-year-old man, Hasher Taheb of Cumming, Georgia, was arrested and charged with “violating Title 18USC 844(f)(1) — attempt to damage by means of an explosive any building owned, possessed, or leased by the United States or any department or agency thereof, or any institution or organization receiving federal financial assistance,” U.S. Attorney Byung J. Pak said in a statement.

The plot included targeting the White House and other buildings with homemade explosives and an anti-tank rocket.

According to the complaint filed in the US District Court in the Northern District of Georgia, Taheb told a FBI informant that he wanted to travel to “hijra,” which is reportedly a term for Islamic State-controlled territory. However, he did not have a passport, according to the complaint, and he told an undercover agent and informant that “if they were to go to another country, they would be one of many, but if they stayed in the United States, they could do more damage.”

The complaint alleges that Taheb planned to sell his car in exchange for weapons, take a road trip to DC, and then attack prospective targets that included the “Washington Monument, the White House, the Lincoln Memorial, a specific synagogue.”

The date for the scheduled attack was January 17, the complaint alleges, and he was arrested after he and an undercover agent and informant exchanged their cars for “three semi-automatic assault rifles, three explosive devices with remote initiation, and one AT-4.” The weapons were inert, according to the complaint.

The arrest was the result of a yearlong investigation, and according to Pak, “all potential threats have been neutralized and under control from the inception of this case.”

“It is important to point out that this investigation and arrest were the direct result of a tip from the community, another example of how important it is to contact law enforcement if you see or hear something suspicious,” FBI special agent Chris Hacker said in a statement.

Taheb was arrested on Wednesday in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and he appeared briefly in court. INSIDER contacted the US Attorney’s Office in the Northern District of Georgia for more information and will update as necessary.