I had lunch at Singapore’s first soufflé restaurant – and left feeling weirdly full

The Comte cheese soufflé – the best tasting of the lot (in my opinion).
Business Insider/Rachel Chia

I don’t know about you, but I seldom see soufflés being sold in Singapore.

The light-as-air, 18th-century French dish is made by baking egg yolks combined with beaten egg whites.

So when I heard there was a restaurant here dedicated to the dish – aptly named Soufflé – I was curious to see if it would make for a filling lunch.

Business Insider visited Soufflé in July for a media tasting. Here’s how it went:


Located on Duxton Hill, Soufflé has a charming blue exterior modeled after a French bistro.

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The restaurant is under Déliciae Hospitality Management (DHM), which also owns L’Entrecôte, Sabio, Ange Café, and Forlino Italian.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

The interior, painted in white, is light and airy, with copper and turquoise accents.

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The 48-seater restaurant features artwork created by Singaporean fashion illustrator Grace Ciao.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

We started the meal with laksa soufflé (S$23) and lobster soufflé (S$28).

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They soufflé on its own had a very subtle taste and a light texture. It was like eating a cloud of slightly eggy air.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

According to a spokesman, the laksa souffle was the most popular. I could see why.

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The sauce had bits of fishcake in it, and was rich and tasty.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

The restaurant also sells main dishes (S$32), each with a mini-soufflé on the side. My absolute favourite was the beef bourguignon.

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The hearty stew had beef and vegetables.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

I thought the cheese soufflé that came with it was the best soufflé in terms of flavour.

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The salty, crisp Comte crust gave it a huge boost in taste and texture.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

Coming in a close second was the duck confit with mashed potato, which came with a truffle mushroom soufflé.

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Much like the cheese, the mushrooms and truffle oil helped a lot.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

We also tried a veal stew…

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It had a sour and slightly gamey taste.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

…and bouillabaisse, a French fish stew.

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It tasted healthier than the other mains.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

In contrast to its airy cousins, the lime iced soufflé (S$18) we had for dessert was so dense, it felt like eating cold cream.

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It was beautifully decadent, but too much for one person to polish off.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

Booze lovers will enjoy the Grand Marnier soufflé topped with candied oranges.

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Diners can pour as much on the soufflé as they want.
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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

Overall, the meal left me feeling full, although strangely so.

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Business Insider/Rachel Chia

As someone who likes her dishes to feel solid, I quickly realised that eating soufflé left me with a weird sensation: My stomach told me it was full, but because of the super-light texture, I felt like I hadn’t eaten much.

I highly recommend ordering mains here, as you get the best of both worlds – a satisfying portion of meat and vegetables, and the chance to enjoy the soufflé’s airy texture, which is notoriously hard to achieve.

One key thing to remember is this is not a restaurant you can pop in for a quick meal – if you’re having three courses, like I did, you should budget about two hours of time.  Because the dish collapses minutes after leaving the oven, each soufflé is made to order, so be prepared to wait at least 20 minutes for one.

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