John Stamos broke his silence over Lori Loughlin’s alleged involvement in the college admissions scandal, calling it a ‘difficult situation’

Actor John Stamos has broken his silence over the college admissions scandal and his longtime friend and costar Lori Loughlin’s alleged involvement.

Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, were indicted in March on charges of fraud. Prosecutors said they paid $500,00 to guarantee their daughters’ admissions into the University of Southern California as crew recruits. The two have pleaded not guilty.

Loughlin is not expected to return to her role on the Netflix show “Fuller House,” and was edited out of her Hallmark Channel show, “When Calls the Heart.”

Speaking to Entertainment Tonight, her “Fuller House” costar Stamos called it a “difficult situation.”

He said he didn’t know how Loughlin’s absence would be addressed in the upcoming season.

“I haven’t been on the show yet and it hasn’t come up, so I’m going to talk to some people about it this week and see what’s going on,” Stamos said. “I’m just going to wait a little longer before I talk about it. It’s a difficult situation for everyone involved. I don’t mean just on our side.”

Read more: Here’s the full list of people charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, and who has pleaded guilty so far

The release date for the final season of “Fuller House” has not been announced. Stamos said it would be split into two parts, with nine episodes each.

Prosecutors said in a criminal complaint that Giannulli and Loughlin used bribes to facilitate their elder daughter Isabella’s admission to USC by having her pose as a recruited crew coxswain, though she had never participated in the sport. As part of the scheme, Giannulli sent the scheme’s ringleader, William “Rick” Singer, a photo of Isabella on a rowing machine, the court document said.

Loughlin and Giannulli then repeated the scheme for Olivia Jade, prosecutors said.

Loughlin and Giannulli have pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest-services mail fraud, as well as conspiracy to commit money laundering.

They face up to 40 years in prison for the charges.