Kia’s new Telluride concept features suicide doors and tech to cure jetlag

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Paul Szoldra/Business Insider

Kia’s new Telluride car looks like a high-end luxury SUV, and the South Korean automaker has a few original touches up its sleeve.

Kia hasn’t said whether the Telluride would actually go into production, but it boasts some really impressive technology inside. That includes therapeutic lighting it says will help treat jet lag, and a system for rear passengers to choose media by just swiping their hand.

The company debuted it earlier this year in Detroit at the North American International Auto Show. We checked it out last week at the Orange County Auto Show in Anaheim, California.

Here’s what it’s like.


The Telluride is a full-size SUV that can comfortably seat seven passengers. One of the first things we noticed, of course, were the “suicide” doors in the back, making it easier for people to get in and out.

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Paul Szoldra/Business Insider

Inside are three rows of seats. If you happen to score the middle row, however, you can enjoy seats that fold down nearly flat and have fold-away footrests.

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Paul Szoldra/Business Insider

“The Telluride’s theme is all about technology,” Kia says, showing “what a large luxurious SUV may look like in the future.”

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Paul Szoldra/Business Insider

One of those technological features is what Kia calls “Light Emitted Rejuvenation.” Each seat has sensors built into the seats, which measures passenger vitals, and displays them on screens on the door panels.

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Paul Szoldra/Business Insider

That data is then used by the LER system to offer “therapeutic light” from an LED panel that Kia says will help with jet lag and passengers’ energy levels. It also has “swipe command” inside, which allows people in the back to control media by swiping their hand.

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Paul Szoldra/Business Insider

This thin touch-sensitive band is mounted to the second row console. Rear passengers can then play music through all the speakers, or grab wireless headphones from inside the console for private listening.

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Paul Szoldra/Business Insider