An NFL player allegedly mocked a teen Chick-fil-A employee on Snapchat — and now the boy’s family is suing claiming ‘abuse’

Pittsburgh Steelers defensive player Sean Davis is being sued by the family of a Chick-fil-A employee for libel, cyberbullying, and intentional infliction ofemotional distress.

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Pittsburgh Steelers defensive player Sean Davis is being sued by the family of a Chick-fil-A employee for libel, cyberbullying, and intentional infliction ofemotional distress.
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  • Pittsburgh Steelers defensive player Sean Davis is facing a lawsuit over a Snapchat video he posted while waiting on his food at a Chick-fil-A drive-thru.
  • “Chick-fil-A got little kids,” Davis says in the video, which shows a teen employee of the fast-food chain. “This kid like eight years old. No wonder the lines be so long at Chick-fil-A.”
  • The lawsuit claims the teen was bullied at school as a result of the video and accuses Davis of libel, cyberbullying, and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

The family of a teenage Chick-fil-A employee has filed a lawsuit against Pittsburgh Steelers defensive player Sean Davis which claims he mocked the boy in a Snapchat video.

“Chick-fil-A got little kids,” Davis says in the video, which shows the teen working at a Chick-fil-A drive-thru in Cranberry, Pennsylvania. “This kid like eight years old. No wonder the lines be so long at Chick-fil-A.”

The lawsuit, which was filed by the teenage boy’s family, claims he was later bullied at school over the video, and has since suffered from headaches, depression, sleeplessness and anxiety, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports.

“He got abused in school for a few weeks over it,” the family’s attorney, Andrew Leger, told the Post-Gazette.

The lawsuit accuses Davis of libel, cyberbullying, and intentional infliction of emotional distress.

An attorney for Davis, 24, said the football player’s remarks in the video were directed at Chick-fil-A, and not the boy.

“From our perspective, it was a commentary on a billion-dollar corporation,” Randy Fisher, general counsel for MBK Sports Management Group, told the Post-Gazette. “It had nothing in particular to do with this young man.”

In a news release addressing the lawsuit, MBK Sports Management CEO Eugene Lee called the claims in the lawsuit “baseless” and “frivolous.”

“We remain confident that when the truth is revealed, Mr. Davis will be exonerated completely from these frivolous allegations,” Lee said.

The boy’s family tried to settle the issue outside of court by asking Davis to speak out against cyber bullying in a public service announcement, but Davis declined, according to the Post-Gazette.

Instead, Davis’ legal team invited the boy to attend Steelers training camp over the summer, as well as Davis’ football camp in Washington, DC.

The boy’s family declined the offer.

“The parties for several months have actively negotiated to resolve the matter without litigation, to no avail,” MBK Sports Management said.