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Reports of shots fired outside the Colorado State Capitol amid protests over death of George Floyd

  • The Denver Police Department responded to calls of shots fired outside the Colorado State Capitol Thursday evening amid a peaceful protest over the death of George Floyd.
  • It is not immediately clear if anyone was injured in the incident, but police say they had not yet received reports of any injuries.
  • State Rep. Leslie Herod said on Twitter she went outside to observe the protests when “someone shot into the crowd.”
  • Another witness who was at the Floyd protest said he and his friend “ran for our f—ing lives” and implored others thinking of protesting in Denver not to do so, saying “no one else needs to die.”
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Peaceful demonstrators and at least one state lawmaker took cover at the Colorado State Capitol building Thursday evening after shots were reportedly fired amid protests over the death of George Floyd.

The Denver Police Department responded to reports of shots fired near Colfax and Broadway, but it is not immediately clear if anyone was injured in the incident.

Representatives from the Denver Police Department did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for more information.

Colorado state Rep. Leslie Herod, who was present during the incident, simply tweeted “We just got shot at. [sic] Capitol.”

Herod told the Denver Post’s Alex Burness that she was observing the protests outside the capitol when “someone shot into the crowd,” she said.

“We heard multiple gunshots,” Herod said. “State Patrol is on scene. They told us all to get down and run.”

Herod told Insider that she heard the gunshots, was told to get down by police and then ran into the capitol. She told Insider one of the shots made it into the building. She also said the suspect has been apprehended, which has not yet been confirmed by authorities at the scene.

“We’re going to stand up for our community,” Herod said regarding the protests, adding that gunshots will not intimidate those working to end police brutality. “We will continue to do the work,” she said, in light of Floyd’s death, who died after a white police officer knelt on his neck for eight minutes in Minneapolis.

KKTV reporter Spencer Wilson shared a video from the scene 15 minutes after shots were fired, saying “Bullets just wizzed by on the state capital, police yelled for us to get down, then took off towards the west lawn.”

One witness, who said he was at the capitol protesting over Floyd’s death when shots were fired, said he and his friend “ran for our f—ing lives after the incident.” He then implored on other members of the public not to attend the protest in Denver, adding that “no one else needs to die.”

This story is developing. We will update as more information becomes available.

Costco’s free samples will be back by June, but they may not be the same after the coronavirus

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Tim Boyle / Getty Images

  • Costco’s free food sample stations are set to begin returning in June, according to CFO Richard Galanti.
  • In Thursday’s earnings call, Galanti spoke to analysts about how the coronavirus pandemic has affected the warehouse club’s latest quarterly earnings.
  • Galanti said that the chain will be issuing new rules regarding sampling, saying that members will not longer be able to “just pick up an open sample with your fingers.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus pandemic has effectively put a halt to a quintessential Costco experience: snagging free food samples.

But Costco CFO Richard Galanti told analysts on a Thursday earnings call that the chain’s food sampling stations will begin returning in some capacity in June. In response to a question from Barclays managing director Karen Short, Galanti said the chain will instate new sanitary rules regarding samples.

“We’re going to start doing some things in mid-June on a slow rollout basis in sampling,” he told analysts. “I can’t tell you any more, but it’s – needless to say – not going to be where you go and just pick up an open sample with your fingers.”

The coronavirus has proved catastrophic for sample servers working in the warehouse chain. Many Costco sample servers work for Club Demonstration Services, a third-party product demonstration company. The company temporarily shuttered on April 6, resulting in layoffs affecting thousands of sample servers working at Costco.

And free samples aren’t the only aspect of Costco food culture that has been negatively impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. As a result of the virus, Costco food courts have been operating with a “limited menu.” In an announcement posted on Costco’s website on May 4, the retailer said that its food courts would only be fulfilling takeout orders. Galanti said that “a good portion of our food court item offerings were eliminated for Q3.”

“We’ve added some but not all the items back by now,” Galanti said.

Costco did not immediately respond to Business Insider’s request for comment. It is unclear what menu items are being dropped, and what the new rules regarding food samples will be. Galanti said that the chain’s warehouses are still enforcing “social distancing and sanitizing,” and noted that many food courts have been “closed or mitigated during the majority of the quarter.”

In an earnings statement published on its website, Costco announced that “April sales were negatively impacted by COVID-19,” due to stay-at-home and social distancing orders dampening sales. The retailer said “limited service” in the warehouse chain’s food court helped squash April sales, along with gasoline price deflation and closures of Costco’s optical and photo departments.

Costco reported comparable sales of -4.7% for the entire company but noted that comparable sales “excluding gasoline, optical, travel, food court, hearing aids, photo, and foreign exchange” would have been 8.6%. According to its 2019 annual financial statement, Costco considers those operations as “ancillary businesses” meant to “provide expanded products and services, encouraging members to shop more frequently.”

Satirical websites are testing Facebook’s policy on not being the ‘arbiter of truth’ by running false headlines claiming Mark Zuckerberg is dead or abusive

Facebook Chairman and CEO Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington

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Facebook Chairman and CEO Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington
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Reuters

  • Two satirical websites are testing Facebook’s stance that it shouldn’t be the “arbiter of truth.”
  • The websites shared satirical articles with fictional headlines about CEO Mark Zuckerberg to Facebook on Wednesday.
  • The posts came just as Zuckerberg had reiterated the company’s stance on freedom of expression during broadcast news interviews before Trump signed a new executive order aimed at social media companies.
  • Facebook has in the past refused to take down a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and a fake video purporting to show Zuckerberg that appeared on Facebook-owned Instagram.
  • Facebook’s rules on removing manipulated media do not apply to parody or satire.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A couple of satirical websites are putting Facebook’s stance that it shouldn’t be the “arbiter of truth” to the test.

The Shovel and The Chaser, both satirical websites based in Australia, shared parody stories on Facebook with headlines that are filled with false claims about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. The Shovel’s headline incorrectly said the Facebook CEO had died, while The Chaser’s headline falsely called Zuckerberg a “child molester.”

Satirical posts take aim at Facebook

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The Shovel/Facebook and The Chaser/Facebook

The fictional headlines serve as a challenge to Zuckerberg’s recent comments regarding company’s stance on freedom of speech.

The Facebook CEO detailed the social media giant’s policies before President Trump signed a new executive order that scales back protections intended to shield social media websites from responsibility regarding content posted on their platforms.

“I believe strongly that Facebook shouldn’t be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online,” Zuckerberg said to Fox News’ Dana Perino on Wednesday. “I think, in general, private companies shouldn’t be, especially these platform companies, shouldn’t be in the position of doing that.”

President Trump’s signing of a new executive order that would allow federal regulators to amend Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act is reviving the ongoing debate about how giants like Facebook should handle misinformation. The order peels back protections for tech companies and would hold them liable for what users post on their platforms.

Facebook has repeatedly said that it does not want to be the “arbiter of truth” in recent years as concerns about the spread of misinformation and false news has heightened.

“I don’t think we have to be the publisher and we definitely don’t want to be the arbiter of truth,” Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg said back in 2017 to the BBC, according to CNBC. “We don’t think that’s appropriate for us. We think everyone needs to do their part. Newsrooms have to do their part, media companies, classrooms and technology companies.”

Facebook did not immediately respond to Business Insider’s questions about whether it was aware of the satirical posts, whether it plans to take any action to remove them or limit their spread, or whether they violate the company’s misinformation policies.

Facebook can remove manipulated posts that might ‘mislead someone’

The platform’s community standards on false news make a distinction for satire: “There is also a fine line between false news and satire or opinion. For these reasons, we don’t remove false news from Facebook, but instead significantly reduce its distribution by showing it lower in the News Feed.”

Facebook’s policies on freedom of expression have still drawn scrutiny from lawmakers, particularly around its choice not to fact-check political ads.

The satirical stories echo what happened in 2019, when Facebook refused to take down a heavily doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi that was intended to make her look incoherent. Facebook instead notified users who attempted to share the video that the clip was fake.

Weeks after that video had circulated, a fake video of Zuckerberg talking about controlling the data of billions of people appeared on Instagram. The video, which Vice first spotted, was created by artists Bill Posters and Daniel Howe in collaboration with advertising firm Canny.

Instagram said in a statement to Business Insider at the time that it would treat the video the same way it treats all misinformation on the platform: It would be removed from Instagram’s recommendation engines, like “Explore.”

Facebook rolled out new protocols for handling doctored videos in January that involve removing media that has been manipulated in ways that could “mislead someone into thinking that a subject of the video said words that they did not actually say.”

Videos that are the product of artificial intelligence to merge content with a video to make it appear authentic, also known as a “deepfake,” will be removed under the policy. These rules from January, however, don’t apply to parody or satire.

An interactive map of the US cities and states still under lockdown — and those that are reopening

An usually busy Main Street in Livingston, Montana, after Gov. Steve Bullock ordered the closing of restaurants, bars, and theaters on March 20 in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

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An usually busy Main Street in Livingston, Montana, after Gov. Steve Bullock ordered the closing of restaurants, bars, and theaters on March 20 in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
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William Campbell-Corbis via Getty Images

  • All 50 states have eased at least some of their lockdown restrictions and allowed certain businesses to reopen.
  • There are significant differences in the way states are reopening, with varying rules about retail, restaurants, and masks.
  • Puerto Rico has maintained its original lockdown rules.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

All 50 states US states have loosened restrictions put in place earlier in the pandemic, allowing some businesses to reopen. Some cities and counties in states that are reopening still have their full lockdown policies in place, however, as do Washington, DC and Puerto Rico.

The goal of shelter-in-place rules is by now well understood: to minimize close contact between people, thereby reducing the spread of the coronavirus and flattening the epidemic curve so healthcare systems don’t get overwhelmed.

Given that, many states that are reopening still call for social distancing. In Colorado, restaurants can only have up to 50 occupants, and tables must be at least six feet apart. Alabama’s retail stores are permitted to operate at 50% capacity, and workers in Kentucky will be screened for fever before their shifts.

A map of US lockdowns

The current status of statewide orders is represented on the interactive map below. Red indicates the states with ongoing stay-at-home orders: Delaware and New Jersey (though both have eased some restrictions). Partial state lockdowns are represented in tan, marking states in which at least one city or county still has a stay-at-home order for residents.

The map also shows the patchwork of more specific regulations across the country regarding retail, restaurants, and mask-wearing.

On Twitter, fans were split in their reaction to the novel method of bringing fans into the arena – some thought it charming and brilliant, while others compared it to something out of an episode of “Black Mirror.”

As the sports world begins to resume play after lengthy suspensions caused by COVID-19, leagues are left to weigh how to handle not only bringing fans back into the stadium but also how best to recreate the in-arena experience for fans at home.

Over the weekend, Fox Sports 1’s broadcast of Germany’s Bundesliga pumped in artificial crowd noise to fill out the aural void of empty stadiums to surprising success. Similar ideas have been hinted at has the NFL, NBA, and NHL all prepare to start their seasons with fans potentially absent from the arenas.

Should this effort from AGF Aarhus prove a success moving forward, it’s possible more teams and leagues could adopt some similar models. At the very least, it shows that teams are willing to get creative to provide fans with the action they’ve missed.

  • Read more:

The Premier League is set to resume its season beginning on June 17 – here’s what it will look like

NFL owners voted to eliminate one of Bill Belichick’s favorite loopholes from the rulebook

The Trump Administration has deemed professional athletes essential workers in the United States – here’s what that means for the return of sports

Colin Kaepernick, LeBron James, and more athletes from across the sports world respond to the death of George Floyd

Trump’s executive order specifically calls out his feud with Twitter over its move to add fact-check labels to his misleading tweets about mail-in voting

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y Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

  • Trump’s executive order seeking to crack down on social media companies over allegations of political bias specifically calls out his personal feud with Twitter.
  • The order comes days after Twitter added a fact-checking label to the president’s tweets falsely linking vote-by-mail ballots to fraud.
  • Trump railed against the move, accusing the company of “interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election.”
  • Twitter has defended its decision, saying Trump’s tweets violated its civic integrity policy and could “confuse voters about what they need to do to receive a ballot and participate in the election process.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump explicitly called out his personal feud with Twitter in an executive order signed Thursday that takes aim at social media companies over allegations of bias against conservatives.

“Twitter now selectively decides to place a warning label on certain tweets in a manner that clearly reflects political bias. As has been reported, Twitter seems never to have placed such a label on another politician’s tweet,” the order read, though it did not specify which reporting it was referring to.

In the order, Trump also accused Twitter of exhibiting bias by alleging that it had not added labels to tweets from Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff regarding the Russia investigation and singled out a Twitter employee who had tweeted criticism of Trump in the past.

The president’s directive, which comes two days after Twitter fact-checked two of his tweets pushing false claims about voting by mail, seeks to empower federal regulators to narrow the scope of a law that that gives social media companies legal immunity from content published on their platforms and broad authority to moderate it.

Trump ranted against Twitter’s decision in a series of tweets earlier this week, accusing the company of “interfering in the 2020 Presidential Election” and “completely stifling FREE SPEECH.”

Following reports that Trump would issue an executive order Thursday, Twitter defended its decision to add the labels by saying Trump had violated its policy against “manipulating or interfering in elections or other civic processes,” which “includes posting or sharing content that may suppress participation or mislead people about when, where, or how to participate in a civic process.”

“We added a label to two @realDonaldTrump Tweets about California’s vote-by-mail plans as part of our efforts to enforce our civic integrity policy. We believe those Tweets could confuse voters about what they need to do to receive a ballot and participate in the election process,” the company said in a tweet Wednesday evening.

Shortly after signing the order on Thursday, Trump said he would shut down Twitter if his lawyers could find a way to do it.

“I think we shut it down, as far as I’m concerned, but I’d have to go through a legal process,” the president told reporters. “If it were able to be legally shut down, I would do it.”

Despite the president’s threats, however, First Amendment experts say he does not have the power to regulate or shut down social-media companies because he disagrees with them. Tech policy experts echoed that assessment, telling Business Insider that parts of the executive order are not legal at all, while other sections would require agencies to throw out years of judicial precedent.

Twitter did not immediately respond to a request for comment on this story.

How to comment on Reddit posts or reply to other comments on desktop or mobile

It's easy to leave a comment on Reddit.

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It’s easy to leave a comment on Reddit.
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BigTunaOnline/Shutterstock

The social media platform Reddit is hyper-focused on dialogues – starting them, continuing them, and rewarding the most quality contributions.

If you’re ready to engage with Reddit posts, you can get started by commenting.

Here’s how to comment on Reddit, using either the desktop website on your Mac or PC, or the mobile app on your iPhone or Android device.

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How to comment on Reddit via the desktop website

1. Using any internet browser on your Mac or PC, open Reddit and log into your account.

2. Navigate to the post you want to comment on. This can be nearly any post, as long as it hasn’t been locked or archived.

3. At the bottom of the post, there will be a box to enter text. Click it. You can also click “Reply” under anyone else’s comment.

4. Write out your comment, adding any formatting you want using the bottom toolbar, and then post it by clicking “Comment” in the bottom-right corner of the text box.

You can format your comment using the tools at the bottom of the comment box.

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You can format your comment using the tools at the bottom of the comment box.
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Emma Witman/Business Insider

The comment will appear with your username.

How to comment on Reddit via the mobile app

1. Open the Reddit app and sign into your account. If you don’t have the app, you can download it from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.

2. Navigate to the post you want to comment on. This can be nearly any post, as long as it’s not archived or locked.

3. The space to compose your post will appear at the bottom of your screen. Tap “Add a comment” there. You can also tap “Reply” underneath someone else’s comment to reply to that comment.

The

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The “Add a comment” space will be at the bottom of the screen in the Reddit mobile app, regardless of where you’ve scrolled within the post.
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Emma Witman/Business Insider

4. Write out your comment, adding any formatting that you want, and then tap “Send” in the top-right when you’re ready to post.

The posting area in the mobile app has less formatting options than the desktop website.

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The posting area in the mobile app has less formatting options than the desktop website.
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Emma Witman/Business Insider

The comment will be posted with your username.

Related coverage from Tech Reference:

The Chinese CDC now says the coronavirus didn’t jump to people at the Wuhan wet market — instead, it was the site of a super-spreader event

Experts still don’t know where the new coronavirus came from.

Genetic evidence has all but confirmed that the virus originated in Chinese bats before it jumped to humans via an intermediary animal host. But where and how that spillover first happened is still up for debate.

Initially, authorities in Wuhan, China, reported that the first cases of the virus emerged at the local Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market. But following an investigation of the animals sold there, the Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said this week that it has ruled the site out as the origin point of the outbreak.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Gao Fu, the director of the Chinese CDC, told Chinese state media: “It now turns out that the market is one of the victims.”

Samples collected from animals at the market came back negative for the new coronavirus, suggesting that they couldn’t have infected shoppers.

The cases linked to the wet market weren’t the first in China

A woman walks in front of the closed Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market on January 12, 2020.

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A woman walks in front of the closed Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market on January 12, 2020.
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NOEL CELIS/AFP via Getty Images

Wuhan authorities first informed the World Health Organization (WHO) about the unknown, pneumonialike illness that would later be identified as the new coronavirus on December 31.

A majority of the initial 41 cases were linked to the wet market, which was shut down on January 1. Given that the SARS outbreak in 2002 and 2003 started at a similar venue in Guangdong, China, the wet market seemed like a logical origin. (The SARS coronavirus jumped from bats to civet cats to people.)

But none of the animals at the market tested positive for the virus, Colin Carlson, a zoologist at Georgetown University told Live Science. If they were never infected, they couldn’t have been the intermediary host that facilitated the spillover.

A growing body of research supports the Chinese CDC’s conclusion that the outbreak’s origins were unrelated to the market. The virus seems to have been circulating in Wuhan before those 41 cases were reported: Research published in January showed that the first person to test positive for the coronavirus was likely exposed to it on December 1, then showed symptoms on December 8. The researchers behind the study also found that 13 of the 41 original cases showed no link to the wet market.

Similarly, an April study suggested that the coronavirus had already established itself and begun spreading in the Wuhan community by early January.

A man has his temperature checked as he leaves the Hankou railway station in Wuhan, China.

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A man has his temperature checked as he leaves the Hankou railway station in Wuhan, China.
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HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP via Getty Images

The identity of “patient zero” hasn’t been confirmed, but it may have been a 55-year-old man from China’s Hubei province who was infected on November 17, according to the South China Morning Post (SCMP), which reviewed government documents.

The wet market could have been the site of a super-spreader event

Carlson told Live Science that the Wuhan wet market may simply have been the a site of an early super-spreader event – an instance in which one sick person infects an atypically large number of others.

Other super-spreader events around the world have also created clusters of infections that cropped up almost overnight. In Daegu, South Korea, for example, one churchgoer infected at least 43 people.

Passengers wait to pass the boarding gates at the Hankou Railway Station in Wuhan, China, April 8, 2020.

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Passengers wait to pass the boarding gates at the Hankou Railway Station in Wuhan, China, April 8, 2020.
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Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

These instances don’t necessarily involve a person who is more contagious than others or sheds more viral particles. Rather, the infected person has access to a greater number of people in spaces that facilitate infection. A market, in which shoppers interact with one another and vendors in close quarters, is one such risky place.

The coronavirus also probably did not leak from a lab

Lingering questions about the pandemic’s origin have given rise to a range of unsubstantiated theories. One suggests the coronavirus may have accidentally leaked from a local laboratory, the Wuhan Institute of Virology (WIV), in which scientists were researching coronaviruses.

The Wuhan Institute of Virology, pictured on April 17, 2020.

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The Wuhan Institute of Virology, pictured on April 17, 2020.
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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty

But both Chinese and US researchers said there’s no evidence to support that theory. The high-security lab says it has no record of the novel coronavirus’ genome, and it follows strict safety measures.

The director of the WIV, Wang Yanyi, told China Central Television last weekend that the new coronavirus is genetically different from any kind of live virus that has been studied at the institute. Prior to that, WIV virologist Shi Zhengli – who collects, samples, and studies coronaviruses in Chinese bats – told Scientific American that she cross-referenced the new coronavirus’ genome with the genetic information of other bat coronaviruses her team had collected. They didn’t find a match.

“That really took a load off my mind,” Shi said in March, adding, “I had not slept a wink for days.”