Ryan Reynolds posted a shocked response to a surprising child ‘Deadpool’ deepfake

Screenshots from the Ryan Reynolds child deepfake video on Twitter.

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Screenshots from the Ryan Reynolds child deepfake video on Twitter.
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Screenshot Twitter/@ActionMovieKid

  • As deepfake videos and the technology to make them become more widespread and accessible, the possibilities for digital trickery are endless (for better or for worse).
  • In a surprising twist, a video posted on Twitter of a child wearing a Deadpool costume turned into a deepfake of “Deadpool” actor Ryan Reynolds.
  • The actor noticed the video himself, tweeting “WTF” in response.
  • It isn’t the highest quality deepfake on the web, but the resulting effect is pretty creepy – and funny.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A sort of creepy, sort of funny video of a deepfake featuring a child dressed as the titular “Deadpool” character caught actor Ryan Reynolds’ attention with a twist ending is that revealed a deepfake of Reynolds himself.

The “Deadpool” star was interacting with fans on Twitter who dressed up as the anti-hero for Halloween when he came across the video, created by the YouTuber behind the channel “Action Movie Kids.” The creator, Daniel Hashimoto, regularly posts a lot of clever, humorous video skits featuring his kids that reference popular movies and characters.

For this clip, Hashimoto wrote “My kid dressed up as #Deadpool @VancityReynolds.” In the video, the kid in question can be seen strutting around in a full Deadpool costume, including a mask, while Hashimoto can be heard in the background saying “Woah, there he is. I love the costume, let me see. That’s amazing. Can I get one without the mask?”

Then, the kid rips off his mask to reveal Reynolds’ face underneath. “There you go,” the fake Reynolds head says in the actor’s voice. The real Reynolds quote-tweeted it and wrote “WTF.”

This deepfake isn’t as convincing as some others that have surfaced, like this one of Russian President Vladimir Putin, and it’s used as harmless fun, rather than some of the more nefarious purposes that deepfake technology is already serving elsewhere on the internet.

This clip already has over 6 million views, thanks to Reynolds’ massive Twitter platform and appears to have sparked less concern than some of the doomsday predictions facing the technology – even if it seems to have weirded out Reynolds just a little bit.