Photos show the Saddleridge Fire as it ripped through 7,500 acres of LA’s San Fernando Valley, growing 800 acres per hour

  • Saddleridge Fire has burned through over 7,500 acres of brush north of Los Angeles, spreading at a rate of 800 acres per hour because of the Santa Ana winds. It remains only 13% contained.
  • Mandatory evacuation orders were put into place, affecting about 100,000 people as of Friday evening. At least 31 buildings have been destroyed, and portions of major freeways were closed.
  • California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that the White House granted federal aid to assist in battling the wildfires.
  • Photos depict scenes of devastation and panic from the areas where the wildfire continues to rage.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Saddleridge fire has burned through over 7,500 acres of brush north of Los Angeles, spreading at a rate of 800 acres per hour because of the Santa Ana winds. It remains only 13% contained.

Mandatory evacuation orders were put into place, affecting about 100,000 people as of Friday evening. At least 31 buildings have been destroyed, and portions of major freeways were closed. Over 1,000 firefighters are battling the flames, the LA Fire Department said on Friday.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said during a press conference at 5 p.m. PT that there has been at least one fire-related death after a man died of cardiac arrest.

Read more: A Los Angeles bush fire has burned over 7,500 acres and prompted evacuation orders for 100,000 people – here are the latest updates

California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that the White House granted federal aid to assist in battling the wildfires, saying that it will “ensure the communities grappling with this fire have the vital resources and support they need.”

Photos depict scenes of devastation and panic from the areas where the wildfire continues to rage.


The Saddleridge Fire has ripped through over 7,500 acres of the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles. It has spread 800 acres an hour, officials said on Friday morning.

Source: Reuters


About 100,000 people are under mandatory evacuation orders.

Source: Los Angeles Fire Department


The blaze began on the side of the 210 Freeway on Thursday night, in the Sylmar area of Los Angeles, less than 30 miles from downtown.

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Firefighters battle a wind-driven wildfire in Sylmar, California, October 11, 2019.
source
REUTERS/ Gene Blevins

Source: Los Angeles Times

Read more: The Saddleridge fire in Los Angeles has been stoked by the distinctly devilish Santa Ana winds – here’s why they’re so powerful


Powerful Santa Ana winds drove the flames into residential areas so quickly late Thursday night that officials couldn’t warn residents.

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Flying embers fill the night sky to the ground in the early morning hours Friday in Porter Ranch, California, October 11, 2019.
source
REUTERS/ Gene Blevins

Source: LA Times


Residents in the Granada Hills and Porter Ranch neighborhoods roused each other in the middle of the night, grabbing what they could and fleeing.

Source: LA Times


“I started knocking on all my neighbors’ doors because I knew they were sleeping,” Porter Ranch resident Cece Merkerson told the LA Times. “I’m banging and banging and I woke up about eight of them — and they all looked at me like I was crazy.”

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A man stomps on flames of the Saddleridge Fire in the Porter Ranch section of Los Angeles, California, in the early morning hours of October 11, 2019.
source
Photo by DAVID MCNEW/AFP via Getty Images

Source: LA Times


Over 1,000 firefighters are battling the blaze, and 13% of the fire has been contained.

Source: LAFD


Locals retreated to seven different evacuation centers.

Source: LAFD


Though the fire continues to spread, some Granada Hills residents have been able to return to the charred remains of their neighborhood.


The fire has burned at least 25 buildings and homes.

Source: LAFD


Portions of four major freeways closed on Friday.

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Freeway 5 and 14 are closed to traffic through Newhall Pass due to Saddle Ridge fire in on Friday October 11, 2019.
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Photo by Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Source: LA Times


The fires and road closures created traffic jams Thursday night and Friday morning.

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Freeway traffic comes to a standstill as a wind-driven wildfire burns in Sylmar, California, October 10, 2019.
source
REUTERS/ Gene Blevins

Source: LA Times


Helicopters and Super Scoopers ⁠— aircraft that fly low over lakes or reservoirs and scoop up water ⁠— are trying to drown the flames.


But officials say it could take days to completely put out the blaze.

Source: LA Times / The Mercury News


“Nobody’s going home right away,” LA Fire Department Chief Ralph Terrazas told reporters at a press conference on Friday.