Sarawak is conducting tests on White Rabbit candy after Brunei authorities found traces of pig gelatin in the sweet

Previously, Brunei’s Ministry of Religious Affairs (MORA) announced on May 18 that testing by the Halal Food Control Division there revealed that pork protein was one of the ingredients used to make White Rabbit candy.
Singapore Press Holdings

A laboratory test on the hugely popular White Rabbit candy is set to reveal if the sweet does indeed contain pig gelatin as Brunei authorities have reported.

The Sarawak Islamic Religious Department (JAIS) in Malaysia announced on Thursday (May 23) that they will be conducting tests on the milk-based candy following a claim by authorities in Brunei that it contains pig gelatin, Borneo Post has reported.

Minister in charge of Islamic affairs Abdul Rahman Junaid noted that the candy – which originates from China – does not have a halal logo, and added that an announcement would be made if the claims were found to be true.

Until then, the sweets will continue to remain on the shelves, he said.

Previously, Brunei’s Ministry of Religious Affairs (MORA) announced on May 18 that testing by the Halal Food Control Division there revealed that pork protein was one of the ingredients used to make White Rabbit candy, The Scoop reported.

The ministry has since ordered retailers to move any existing stock to the non-halal section of supermarkets and also cautioned Muslim consumers to avoid the product, The Scoop said.

Following the announcement, ice cream sellers such as Project Ice Cream and Rumah Gelato have also discontinued the sales of their White Rabbit ice cream flavours.

Rumah Gelato also added that they would be taking the necessary steps to clean their equipment and facilities thoroughly.

Manufactured by Shanghai Guan Sheng Yuan Food, the White Rabbit candy brand experienced a recent resurgence in popularity after an ice creamery in Los Angeles launched a flavour named after it.

The store reportedly sold over 100 gallons of the flavour in just 24 days after a photo of the ice cream went viral online, sparking a trend in ice cream shops worldwide, including Malaysia.

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