A solar-powered yacht that claims to be virtually silent as it cruises is on the market for $1.54 million — here’s a look inside

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

The Silent 55 takes “chasing the sun” to a whole new level.

The Austrian shipyard Silent Yachts has been experimenting with alternative energy sources for yachts since 2005. Its newest yacht, the Silent 55, is a solar-electric catamaran that the company says can run completely on solar energy and cruises silently.

The Silent 55 catamaran made its debut at the Cannes Yachting Festival earlier this year and has since been making the boat show circuit, most recently appearing at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

Solar panels lining the vessel not only support solar-propulsion, but air conditioning and lighting, too, eliminating the need for a generator. When necessary, electric-propulsion can support the vessel as well. This eco-friendly yacht is just one example in a recent trend of of sustainable luxury travel.

Robb Report’s Julia Zaltzman reported the Silent 55 is selling for 1.4 million euros (or about $1.54 million).

Here’s a look inside the vessel.


Austrian shipyard Silent Yachts unveiled a new solar-powered catamaran at this year’s Cannes Yachting Festival.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

It has since appeared at the famed Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

Source: Silent Yachts


The 55-foot vessel is lined with 30 solar panels that reach 10 kilowatts each.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

The panels use maximum power point tracking solar charge regulators and lithium batteries. An inverter provides power to other necessities like air conditioning and lighting in the cabins.

Source: Silent Yachts, Robb Report


The catamaran was designed to have zero emissions and to cruise up to 100 miles per day.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


In addition to its eco-friendly features, the vessel also has lavish amenities.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


There are multiple spots to lounge, including trampoline-like netting along the bow of the boat.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


There are also outdoor …

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


… and indoor dining areas.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


The two hulls encompass four cabins …

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A guest cabin.
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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


… including a full-beam master suite with natural light.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


Each cabin is additionally equipped with its own private bathroom.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


The Silent 55 represents “an entirely new dynamic in yachting,” Silent Yachts president and founder, Michael Kohler said in a press release. Boaters are striving to be more eco-friendly but are unwilling to sacrifice luxury.

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Courtesy of Silent Yachts

Source: Silent Yachts


The “new dynamic” in yachting that Kohler references has particularly taken off in 2019.

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A rendering of Aqua, set to be the world’s first hydrogen-powered yacht.
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Courtesy of Sinot

Business Insider previously reported that a model for the first hydrogen-powered yacht was unveiled in September by Sinot, a Dutch yacht-design company. The concept is similar to that of the Silent 55, albeit on a larger scale. The 367-foot vessel will be completely powered by liquid hydrogen and fuel-cell technology. Its only emission will be water.

The idea of alternative sources powering luxury vessels extends from yachts to cruises: The world’s first hybrid cruise ship is currently on its maiden voyage to Antarctica. The MS Roald Amundsen runs on low sulfur diesel fuel supported by battery packs, cutting cruise ship emissions by 20%.

Increased attention to sustainability and conservation in the luxury travel sector play into the larger trend of “transformational travel.” Ultimately, the ultrawealthy want to leave their vacation with a transformative, emotional experience to bring home, and in some cases, want to make a positive impact on the places they visit.