Surprise, surprise – Google tops Glassdoor’s list of best workplaces in Singapore, with no local firms in the top 10

To be considered for the ranking, a company must have at least 20 ratings across eight workplace attributes, including career opportunities, compensation, culture, work-life balance, and six-month business outlook.
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  • Google has come in tops in Glassdoor’s first Singapore version of its Best Places to Work ranking.

  • In the top 10 are Facebook, Shell, Amazon, Microsoft, Visa, AIA, HubSpot, JP Morgan, and HP.

  • The ranking is only open to companies with over 1,000 employees.

Employees of Google must be the happiest workers in Singapore, if Glassdoor’s new employer ranking is anything to go by.

The job review site published its first-ever local Best Places to Work 2020 ranking on Wednesday (Dec 11), naming the American tech giant as the Republic’s top workplace.

Read also: Want to work at Google? This Singapore-based mentorship service for millennials has already got 5 grads in the door

In second place was Facebook, followed by Shell, Amazon, and Microsoft.

Rounding out the top 10 were Visa, insurer AIA, HubSpot, JP Morgan, and HP.

Eight of these companies (excluding AIA and Visa) also placed among the top 10 workplaces in other countries Glassdoor published rankings for.

Glassdoor said its ranking was determined by the quality and consistency of site reviews submitted by Singapore-based employees (excluding interns) over a one-year timeframe.

Universities, the army, and multi-level marketing agencies were not eligible for inclusion in this ranking, which companies cannot nominate themselves for.

To be considered, a company must have over 1,000 employees and at least 20 Glassdoor ratings across eight workplace attributes, including career opportunities, compensation, culture, work-life balance, and six-month business outlook.

Glassdoor’s chief economist, Andrew Chamberlain, said that workers were increasingly prioritising culture over salary, and that company culture was quickly becoming a main driver of long-term employee satisfaction.

Jobs‌ ‌in‌ ‌every‌ ‌industry‌ ‌have‌ ‌continued‌ ‌to‌ ‌shift‌ ‌toward‌ ‌‌knowledge-based‌ ‌work‌‌ ‌over‌ the‌ ‌past‌ ‌decade‌ ‌- jobs‌ ‌where‌ ‌workers‌ ‌are‌ ‌highly‌ ‌differentiated,‌ ‌and‌ ‌where‌ ‌the‌ ‌creativity‌ and‌ ‌knowledge‌ ‌of‌ ‌one‌ ‌individual‌ ‌worker‌ ‌can‌ ‌have‌ ‌a‌ ‌huge‌ ‌impact‌ ‌on‌ ‌a‌ ‌business,” he said.

Businesses,‌ ‌especially‌ ‌high-performing‌ ‌ones,‌ ‌increasingly‌ ‌recognise‌ ‌that‌ ‌their‌ ‌employees‌ are‌ ‌their‌ ‌most‌ ‌important‌ ‌asset,‌ ‌not‌ ‌buildings‌ ‌or‌ ‌machinery‌ ‌or‌ ‌software.‌ ‌Online‌ ‌workplace‌ ‌transparency‌ ‌‌has‌ ‌become‌ ‌an‌ ‌accepted‌ ‌norm‌ ‌among‌ ‌job‌ ‌seekers… candidates‌ ‌are‌ ‌investing‌ ‌more‌ ‌time‌ ‌and‌ ‌energy‌ ‌researching‌ ‌company‌ ‌culture‌ before‌ ‌accepting‌ ‌jobs.”

Chamberlain added that modern workers were looking for companies with clearly-defined job progression and “inspiring, empathetic, and competent” senior leaders.

“Being a culture-first organisation isn’t about expensive perks, but about articulating a clearly-stated mission that resonates with employees’ own aspirations and fuels their best performance,” the economist added.