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A man who was hired by loggers to cut trees in the Amazon rainforest sits in Brazil's Jamanxim National Park, June 21, 2013.

The Amazon rainforest is about to cross an irreversible threshold that will turn it into a savanna, top scientists say

Fires and logging could trigger a process called "dieback," in which the rainforest would dry up, burn, and become a savanna-like landscape.

Schools affected by forest fire in Johor to reopen as 70 per cent of blaze extinguished

Two nearby schools which were ordered shut will reopen.
Francisco da Silva Vale and his son Hercules navigate during a fishing session at Vila Nova do Amana in the Sustainable Development Reserve, Amazonas state, Brazil, September 23, 2015.

Earth is a spaceship, and the Amazon is a crucial part of our life-support system, creating up to 20% of our oxygen. Here’s why we need the worl...

The Amazon produces up to 20% of the world's oxygen, helps cycle water and regulate weather across the globe, and holds 10% of Earth's biodiversity.
The aftermath of a forest fire in the Amazon in 1990.

The Amazon Rainforest is burning. Here’s why there are so many fires and what it all means for the planet.

The Amazon is on fire because farmers are setting trees ablaze to clear land for crops and pastures. Warm, dry conditions makes these blazes worse.

‘Every year we have wildfires’: Brazil’s president insists fires in the Amazon are no worse than normal, as he sends the army to fig...

"We are in a traditionally hot and dry season, with high winds, when every year we have wildfires," Bolsonaro said in a speech Friday.
An aerial view of a tract of Amazon jungle burning as it gets cleared by loggers and farmers near the city of Novo Progresso, Brazil, August 23, 2019.

Brazil has seen 100,000 fire alerts in 10 days, but it’s not just the Amazon — one map shows how much of South America is burning

A record 74,000 fires ignited in Brazil this year. In addition to the Brazilian Amazon, much of South America is on fire too.
A man works in a burning tract of Amazon jungle as it is being cleared by loggers and farmers in Iranduba, Amazonas state, Brazil, August 20, 2019.

The fires in the Amazon are the result of seasonal burning that farmers do every year. Here’s why they’ve gotten so bad this summer.

Farmers regularly set fires to clear new tracts of land. Scientists and environmentalists think they're behind this month's record-setting blazes.
A NASA satellite image of the fires raging across Brazil and the Amazon basin on August 21, 2019.

The blazes in the Amazon are so big they can be seen from space. One map shows the alarming scale of the fires.

The Brazilian Amazon is burning at a record rate. Nearly 10,000 fires have sparked in the past week, and satellites have spotted the blazes.
A charred tree trunk on a tract of Amazon jungle that was burned by loggers and farmers in Iranduba, Amazonas state, Brazil, August 20, 2019.

The ‘lungs of the planet’ are burning at a record rate. If too much of the Amazon disappears, that ‘dieback’ could turn the la...

Both deforestation and wildfires in the Amazon rainforest have broken records this summer. Scientists warn that, after a point, it might not recover.
Darkened sky in Sao Paulo, Brazil on August 19, 2019.

Amazon fires created a smoke eclipse in the skies above Brazil’s largest city, 2,000 miles away

On Monday, smoke from thousands of fires in the Amazon rainforest spread out some 2,000 miles, darkening the sky in São Paulo, Brazil.