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‘Inside Edition’ confronted suspected subway fare evaders in New York and now people are dragging the video for unnecessarily accosting co...

"Inside Edition" reported that New York lost $215 million in revenue in 2018 because of people who skipped out on paying their subway fares.
Senate Majority Whip John Thune (R-S.D.)

Step aboard the little-known subway line below Capitol Hill that lawmakers use to get around

While mostly frequented by lawmakers, the trains are for anyone to ride as long as they are cleared to enter the Capitol.
Mexico City's metro is clean, quiet, and efficient.

I checked out Mexico City’s metro and was blown away by how it’s much cleaner, faster, and quieter than New York’s subway. Here̵...

I rode the metro for four days in the Mexican capital — and it made me never want to return to my New York commute.
Senate Majority Whip John Thune (R-S.D.)

Step aboard the little-known subway line below Capitol Hill that lawmakers use to get around

While mostly frequented by lawmakers, the trains are for anyone to ride as long as they are cleared to enter the Capitol.
The Dubai Metro comprises two train lines and 49 stations.

How 10 of the world’s most famous subway systems compare, from Dubai to New York City

Public transportation systems vary greatly between major world cities. We selected 10 of the most famous metro systems in the world and compared them by size, length, operating hours, and ticket cost.
The Moscow Metro is one of the busiest in the world — 9 million people ride the train each day.

A photographer spent 3 months following commuters on the Moscow Metro to see what life is really like in the capital of Russia

The Moscow Metro is one of the busiest metro systems in the world, transporting 9 million people a day. Here's what their commute looks like.
The New York subway cars are cleaned by hand, overnight.

New York City subway cars are cleaned by hand — and it takes one person 3 and a half hours to do it

New York subway cars host over 5 million people on a typical weekday, and it shows. But MTA workers fight the grime by hand.