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This image was the winner in the 2019 wildlife photojournalism category. It depicts an image of a jaguar projected onto a section of the US-Mexico border fence under a star-studded Arizona sky.

The best wildlife photos taken this year reveal a horde of interlocked ants and a vicious stand-off between a fox and a marmot

The winners of the 2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest showcase animals' struggle to survive in harsh conditions and get a decent meal.
The Moment by Yongqing Bao, China.

A life-or-death photo of a fox attempting to capture a marmot just won the most prestigious wildlife photography award

The Moment, by Yongqing Bao, features a Tibetan fox and a marmot, capturing "the drama and intensity of nature."
Stems of Eurasian watermilfoil, bearing soft, feathery leaves, reach for the sky from the bed of Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland.

The best wildlife photos taken this year reveal a hippo murder, a hungry leopard seal, and a weevil ensnared by zombie fungus

The front-runners in the 2019 Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest showcase human-animal interactions and animals' struggle to get a decent meal.
Spotted owlets take shelter in a waste pipe in Kapurthala, Punjab, India.

The most gorgeous wildlife photos of 2018 shine a light on nature’s bizarre and wonderful beauty

Wildlife across the globe stunned in 2018. Here are some winners from the London Natural History Museum's Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest.
"Giant gathering" by Tony Wu, USA. Winner: Behaviour: Mammals.

14 brutal, beautiful images from this year’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest

The winning photo from the 2017 Wildlife Photographer of the Year contest is dark and bloody, though others showcase beautiful moments in nature.
"Memorial to a species" won the Wildlife Photographer of the Year award.

This heartbreaking photo of a recently shot, de-horned black rhino has won the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition

This creme scene was "one of more than 30" the photographer visited while covering the tragic story.