This Japanese anime’s unbelievably accurate depictions of Singapore will blow your mind

Screenshot of a scene in the 6th episode of A Place Further Than the Universe
Facebook/ Ahmad Syalabi

Everyday life is likely to be deadly mundane to the average Singaporean.

Despite the multitude of attractions and things to experience in the city-state, we find it difficult to sustain our enthusiasm and novelty often dies out quickly for us.

Leave it to the most unlikely of people to be more excitable than us Singaporeans.

Anime girls.

The sixth episode of Japanese anime series A Place Further Than the Universe was released on Feb 6 and it wowed Singaporean viewers for more than just its narrative about a quartet of high school girls on their voyage to Antarctica.

The episode features the girls in Singapore for a two-day layover.

Loose adaptations of the garden city have been done before in other anime series such as Plastic Memories and Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure: Stardust Crusaders. However, none have dedicated a full episode to feature Singapore with as much fidelity as A Place Further than the Universe.

A viral Facebook post that pointed out the anime’s high level of accuracy has since garnered even more attention to the episode.

During the girls’ escapade, many of Singapore’s icons such as Changi Airport, the Esplanade, Marina Bay Sands and Gardens by the Bay have been faithfully reproduced. Throughout the episode, they are constantly enchanted by the sights.

Screenshot of a scene in the 6th episode of A Place Further Than the Universe
Facebook/ Ahmad Syalabi

Other well-known locations like Maxwell Food Centre and the Ah Hung D24 Sultan Durian stall also deserved a feature, much to the chagrin of the girls who were less-than-impressed with the smell and taste of durian.

Screenshot of a scene in the 6th episode of A Place Further Than the Universe
Facebook/ Ahmad Syalabi

The anime even includes tongue-in-cheek humour that pokes fun at the amount of English Singapore uses, as well as the common tourist obsession of posing for pictures with the Merlion.

The photo-realism of the animation is the result of intensive research done by Madhouse Studio, the Japanese company that produces the anime, using photographs of Singapore’s landmarks. Netizens have commented that tracing photo composite backgrounds could have also led to the astonishing accuracy.

Perhaps it was the girls’ innocent and realistic reactions and emotions towards their experience in Singapore that charmed viewers as well.

If animated characters can be this appreciative of Singapore’s offerings, surely we Singaporeans can as well.