The company formerly known as Toys R Us is reportedly opening stores in time for Christmas

A Toys R Us advertisement in Hong Kong.

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A Toys R Us advertisement in Hong Kong.
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Budrul Chukrut/Getty

  • The company that holds the majority assets of the defunct Toys R Us chain of toy stores will open new physical locations in time for the holiday season, according to a new report by Bloomberg.
  • The new stores will reportedly be smaller than Toy R Us’ old stores.
  • Toys R Us liquidated in 2018, leaving the US without a dedicated nationwide toy seller.
  • Big-box stores like Walmart and Target made big moves to pick up the holiday slack.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Toys R Us is coming back from the dead – sort of.

Tru Kids, the company that holds the majority assets of the defunct Toys R Us chain of toy stores, will open about a half dozen new physical locations in time for the holiday season, according to a new report by Bloomberg.

Measuring about 10,000 square feet, the new stores would reportedly be smaller than Toy R Us’ old stores but would be more experience-oriented. The brand will also launch a new e-commerce shop.

The company has been pitching toy makers on the new plan, and it may even sell merchandise on consignment, meaning the brands don’t get make money until their merchandise sells, according to the Bloomberg report.

A representative for Tru Kids declined to comment on the report to Business Insider.

Read more: TOY WARS: Walmart and Target are duking it out to take Toys R Us’ place as the holiday-shopping season looms

Toys R Us filed for bankruptcy in 2017 and liquidated its hundreds of stores in the US in 2018, leaving the US without a dedicated nationwide toy retailer.

To fill the gap, big-box stores like Walmart and Target made more space for toys. Some of the changes lasted even after the holidays, as the American retail landscape moves to cover the sinkhole left by the evaporation of Toys R Us.

It remains to be seen how US consumers and competitors would react to a revival of a nationwide toy-focused brand.