How Trump’s $1.5 million Cadillac limo, the Beast, stacks up against Putin’s newest Russian limo

For world leaders, the limousine is an important element in making a grand entrance.

Queen Elizabeth II travels in her Bentleys while the Emperor of Japan prefers a Toyota Century.

Chinese President Xi Jinping usually hits the parade route in a Hongqi L5. German Chancellor Angela Merkel can often be seen climbing into a selection of armored Audi and Mercedes-Benz limos.

But there are few limousines more recognizable than that of the US president, and it’s known simply as the Beast.

For much of the 20th century, various Lincoln limos have been the vehicle of choice for the US president. Yet that changed in the early ’80s when the Reagan administration went with Cadillac. And it’s been all Caddys since.

Read more: Kim Jong Un travels with a convoy of armored Mercedes limos, but the company doesn’t know how he got them

The latest version of the Beast debuted in the fall of 2018. Once again, it’s a Cadillac. The limo was originally commissioned in 2014 by the Obama administration but didn’t go into service till two years into Trump’s presidency.

Russian President Vladimir Putin recently debuted a new presidential limo of his own called the Aurus Senat. Aurus is a new Russian luxury auto brand that debuted the Senat Limo at the 2018 Moscow International Auto Show.

Here’s a closer look at Trump’s new Beast limo and Putin’s Aurus Senat:


Here it is: Trump’s new $1.5 million limo. It’s the latest version of the Beast.

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Source: NBC News


It joins the 2009 Cadillac DTS bodied limo used during the Obama years.

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Kevin Dietsch – Pool/Getty Images

The Secret Service uses both the 2009 and the 2018 limo.

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Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

The Beast may carry the Cadillac branding, but it has little in common with the production sedan it’s designed to resemble. In fact, the limo is built on a General Motors truck chassis.

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REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The US Secret Service does not reveal much detail about the Beast’s specs. What we do know is that it’s heavily armored, weighs as much as 20,000 pounds, and has room for seven. There have been both gasoline and diesel-powered Beast limos. It’s unclear what’s under the hood of the current iteration.

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REUTERS/Mike Segar

Source: Autoweek, NBC News


The limo is designed to be bullet- and blast-resistant. It’s also designed to withstand chemical and biological attacks. Its windows are believed to be 3 inches thick while its steel-and-ceramic armor can measure up to 8 inches thick. The limos are also equipped with Kevlar-lined tires and a foam-sealed fuel tank.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Inside, the president has access to a state-of-the-art communication system along with the protection of a secure oxygen system and a supply of blood in case of injury.

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REUTERS/Carlos Barria

The Aurus Senat is Russian President Vladimir Putin’s new limousine. The Senat made its world debut at the 2018 Moscow International Auto Show.

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Sputnik/Mihail Metzel/Kremlin via REUTERS

Aurus is a new Russian luxury auto brand.

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REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

The Senat is powered by a 598-horsepower 4.4-liter V-8 engine paired with a hybrid drive system mated to a 9-speed automatic transmission sending power to all four wheels. An even more powerful 857-horsepower 6.6-liter hybrid V-12 drive unit is on the way.

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Newspress

The armored Senat is 21.7 feet long and weighs in at 14,330 pounds.

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Newspress

Like the Beast, the presidential Senat is bulletproof and bombproof, the Daily Mail reported. Unfortunately, not much more is known about the Senat’s defensive and safety features.

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Lehtikuva/Roni Rekomaa via REUTERS

Source: Daily Mail


The interior of the Senat is packed with leather and wood accents, along with a modern infotainment system.

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REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov

The production Aurus Senat is expected to go on sale in 2020 with a reported starting price of $160,000. Naturally, Putin’s armored version costs a heck of a lot more.

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Image

Source: Autoweek