The cofounder of WeWork is selling his NYC townhouse for $21 million. Look inside the 5-bedroom home, which was rebuilt after being destroyed in an accidental bombing in 1970.

WeWork cofounder Miguel McKelvey bought the townhouse for $12 million in 2015.

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WeWork cofounder Miguel McKelvey bought the townhouse for $12 million in 2015.
source
Douglas Elliman

Miguel McKelvey, the cofounder of WeWork, is selling his New York City townhouse for $21 million, The New York Post reported.

The WeWork cofounder, who’s worth an estimated $900 million, bought the home for $12 million in 2015, according to The Real Deal. McKelvey stayed with the company as chief culture officer even after a failed IPO attempt and the ousting of Neumann as CEO.

McKelvey’s townhouse has a bizarre history. Originally built in 1845, it was destroyed in 1970 by an accidental bombing by the radical leftist group the Weather Underground.

After the bombing, the home was rebuilt in a modernist style in 1978. McKelvey bought it for $12 million in 2015, according to The Real Deal. The townhouse is also available to rent for $50,000 a month.

Clinton Stowe and Melissa Bolotow of Douglas Elliman have the listing.

Take a look inside the 6,000-square-foot Manhattan townhouse.


WeWork cofounder Miguel McKelvey has put his New York City townhouse up for sale for $21 million, The New York Post reported.

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Jackal Pan/Visual China Group via Getty Images

He bought it for $12 million in 2015, according to The Real Deal.

McKelvey, who cofounded WeWork with former CEO Adam Neumann in 2010, stayed with the company as chief culture officer even after a failed IPO attempt and the ousting of Neumann as CEO.

He’s worth an estimated $900 million, according to Forbes.


McKelvey’s home sits in the heart of Manhattan’s Greenwich Village, a historically bohemian neighborhood that’s now one of the priciest in the city and beloved by celebrities.

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Google Maps

Source: NYC Go


Originally built in 1845. In 1970, the home was almost completely destroyed when a radical leftist group detonated a bomb in the basement. It was completely rebuilt in 1978 in a modernist style.

source
Douglas Elliman

Two members of the group survived the blast, while three members died, according to The New York Times.

At the time, the home owner’s daughter had joined the group in college. She and four other members had been building nail bombs in the basement for targets including a military officer’s club in New Jersey, the Times reported.


The 21-foot-wide home has top-of-the-line tech throughout, including an integrated system for audio, video, shades, and lighting, and radiant heat flooring.

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Douglas Elliman

There’s also full-house humidification, a remote security and intercom system, a water purification system, and a snow-melting system, according to the listing.


The kitchen opens up to the back garden and terrace.

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Douglas Elliman

Source: Douglas Elliman


The home is airy and bright thanks to large windows and high ceilings.

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Douglas Elliman

Source: Douglas Elliman


Colorful — and decidedly raunchy — pop art can be seen throughout the home in the listing photos. The listing agent at Douglas Elliman, Clinton Stowe, confirmed to Business Insider that all the furniture and artwork in the photos is as it was when the owner lived there.

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Douglas Elliman

The home’s master suite sits on the top two floors of the home, where a wall of windows opens up onto a terrace.

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Douglas Elliman

Source: Douglas Elliman


The master suite includes a massive dressing room.

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Douglas Elliman

Source: Douglas Elliman


The spa-like master bathroom is outfitted in light gray marble.

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Douglas Elliman

Source: Douglas Elliman


The rear of the townhouse features a 20-foot wall of windows.

WeWork cofounder Miguel McKelvey bought the townhouse for $12 million in 2015.

source
Douglas Elliman

Source: Douglas Elliman


The back garden and terrace has plenty of entertaining space, with an outdoor kitchen and grill as well as a heated plunge pool.

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Douglas Elliman

For those who don’t want to make the commitment of buying McKelvey’s storied home, it’s also being offered as a rental for $50,000 a month.