All the lavish ways Paul Manafort spent his hidden millions, according to the indictment

Paul Manafort and his wife, Kathleen, at the 2016 Republican National Convention.

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Paul Manafort and his wife, Kathleen, at the 2016 Republican National Convention.
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Rick Wilking/Reuters

    Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, was indicted on Monday morning on a range of charges, including money laundering and tax fraud. Manafort used the money to fund a lavish lifestyle for himself and his family, including multimillion-dollar homes and antique furnishings, the indictment says. The indictment says he also spent millions of dollars on “personal items” like Range Rovers and on shopping in New York and California.

Four Range Rovers, millions of dollars in antiques, and nearly $850,000 worth of men’s clothing are just a few of the “personal items” President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, bought using money in offshore accounts over nearly a decade, an indictment says.

Manafort and his business associate Rick Gates were indicted by a grand jury on Monday on a range of charges, including money laundering and tax fraud. The men are accused of laundering more than $21 million – more than $18 million by Manafort and more than $3 million by Gates – from 2006 to at least 2016. They surrendered to the FBI on Monday morning.

The indictment says that from 2008 to 2014, Manafort used offshore accounts to wire over $12 million to fund a luxurious lifestyle and an additional $6.4 million to purchase two New York City properties – a condominium on Howard Street and a brownstone on Union Street – and a house in Arlington, Virginia.

Keep scrolling to see the vendors of the lavish “personal items” the indictment says Manafort bought using funds in offshore accounts.


$20,000: Housekeeping in New York

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Flickr / Rubbermaid Products

$31,900: Purchases from an art gallery in Florida

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Contemporary/Angela Li

$46,000: Property management company in South Carolina

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Flickr / David Shankbone

$273,455: Payments related to four Range Rovers and a Mercedes-Benz

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Benjamin Zhang/Business Insider

This figure includes $163,705 in payments for three Range Rovers, $47,000 for a separate purchase of a Range Rover, and $62,750 for a Mercedes-Benz.


$558,137: Contractors in Florida and Virginia

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Flickr / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

This includes $125,650 paid to a contractor in Virginia and $432,487 paid to a contractor in Florida.


$500,000: Investment company

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Getty Images/Andreas Rentz

$520,440: Clothing store in Beverly Hills, California

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Filipe Frazao/Shutterstock

$820,240: Landscaper in the Hamptons, New York

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Paul Wishart / Shutterstock.com

This includes separate payments of $164,740 and $655,500 to landscapers in the Hamptons.


$849,215: Men’s clothing store in New York

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Shutterstock/GoncharukMaks

$1,432,106: Home automation and home entertainment companies in Florida and New York

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Shutterstock/Vadim Ovchinnikov

This includes $1,319,281 paid to a home automation, lighting, and home entertainment company in Florida, and $112,825 paid to an audio, video, and control system home integration installation company in the Hamptons.


$1,658,260: Antiques in New York and Virginia

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Shutterstock/bonzodog

This includes $623,910 paid to an antique dealer in New York, as well as $934,350 paid to an antique rug store and $100,000 to a related vendor in Alexandria, Virginia.


$5,434,793: Home improvement company in the Hamptons

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Shutterstock/Jo Ann Snover